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Frame The Importance of

Commercial Truck Insurance in Andersonville, GA

  • Let's face it - truckers in America have always been the backbone of our great country. They still are in modern times. On any given day, thousands of trucks traverse our highways and local roads, delivering goods and products on time so that businesses and consumers have what they need to live life. And while commercial trucking can be an incredibly lucrative way to make a living and put food on the table, it can also be risky and expensive.
  • Whether you're the owner of a fleet, an independent trucker, or have a business that uses big rigs to transport goods, you need commercial trucking insurance to protect you and your client's investments, shield you from liability, and more.
  • That's where working with a reliable truck insurance agency comes into play. Unfortunately, for many commercial truck insurance providers, serving the needs of truckers is low on the proverbial totem pole. At Independence Insurance Agency, nothing could be further from the truth.

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percent The Commercial Truck

Insurance Agency in Andersonville, GA You Can Trust

Much like you pride yourself on running a successful trucking business, Independence Insurance Agency prides itself on its years of experience providing truck insurance for hardworking men and women across the country. And in our experience, insurance rates for truckers are just too high - so high, in fact, that they eat away at their bottom line, making it more difficult to run a business and make a profit. Fortunately, at Independence Insurance Agency, we provide truckers the freedom they need from astronomically high insurance rates so they can stay on the road and keep driving America forward.

As one of the most trusted commercial trucking insurance agencies in the U.S., we understand the challenges that you face daily as a trucker. We also know how important it is to protect your business. That's why we go above and beyond to find you the best-priced coverage available, whether you're an operator, own a small fleet, a large fleet, or something in between.

Commercial Truck Insurance Andersonville, GA

We Put Truckers First Because Others Don't

 Truck Insurance Andersonville, GA

Truckers across the country choose to work with Independence Insurance Agency because we put their needs first before anything else. As experts in transportation insurance, we proudly offer a range of quality insurance products that are both practical and affordable for them. Our industry-leading carriers provide coverage that caters to the unique challenges faced by the trucking industry, ensuring that your business is protected at all times.

At our core, we are committed to finding the best possible price for your coverage without compromising the quality of service you deserve. The truth is, we understand how essential truckers are to the United States and take pride in making their insurance experience more streamlined and affordable.

One way we do so is by simplifying the insurance process. Our transportation specialists take the time to understand your specific needs and budget to tailor a comprehensive plan that works for you. You won't ever have to worry about cookie-cutter plans or uninterested agents when you work with our commercial trucking insurance agency. We take an educational approach to ensure that the entire big rig insurance process is quick, painless, and easy to understand. If there's something you don't understand, we're happy to take the time to explain. After all, the success and safety of your business are on the line.

Looking to the future, we are committed to providing innovative new products that cater to the ever-changing needs of truck drivers. As your one-stop shop for commercial trucking insurance, we are dedicated to your success, one policy at a time.

If you're a commercial trucker looking to ensure your rig, you can rest easy knowing that Independence Insurance Agency provides:

  • Affordable Trucking Insurance Plans for Any Budget
  • Exemplary Customer Service
  • Seasoned Transportation Specialists Who Customize Plans to Your Needs
  • A+ Carriers Across the Country
  • Simple, Easy Quote and Bind Process
  • Multiple Insurance Carriers Quoted to Find You the Best Rates
  • Truck Insurance for New Ventures

Call us or send us a message today to learn more about the best 18-wheeler insurance options for your trucking business.

chart The Commercial Truck

Common Types of Big Rig Truck Insurance in Andersonville, GA

At Independence Insurance Agency, we offer several types of insurance coverage for local, intermediate, and long-haul trucking needs. Here are just a few categories of trucking insurance coverage that our agency offers.

As the foundation of your insurance policy, liability coverage is required by law in most states in the U.S. It provides coverage for damage or injuries caused to properties or other people if your 18-wheeler is responsible for the crash. Without liability coverage, it's almost impossible to drive a truck or run a trucking business without major legal consequences.

Having physical damage coverage is an essential component that shouldn't be overlooked. This insurance is responsible for covering the expenses related to repairing or replacing your truck in situations such as accidents, theft, vandalism, and other damaging events. By having this coverage, you can rest assured that your business won't be affected significantly by unexpected incidents, and you can continue running your operations smoothly even in challenging times.

For trucking companies, the goods they transport are crucial to their operations. To protect these goods from damage, loss, or theft while in transit, cargo insurance is essential. This coverage provides much-needed peace of mind for both you and your clients, allowing you to reimburse clients for any losses sustained while protecting your reputation and brand identity.

Non-Trucking Liability Insurance is designed to cover property damage or bodily injury that may occur during personal time when the driver/truck is not under dispatch. This coverage can be applied with or without a trailer and is added to a commercial policy as an endorsement.

While Independence Insurance Agency has built a reputation of excellence in serving the needs of truckers, we also offer general liability. Also known as Truckers General Liability, this coverage insures for bodily injuries or property damage that happen due to business activities that are NOT the cause of operating a truck. It covers accidents that occur in parking lots, rest stops, also while loading or unloading. General liability can also cover losses related to theft and vandalism. Most brokers and shippers will require this coverage to work with you.

Bobtail insurance is a type of coverage that is comparable to non-trucking liability, which is designed to offer protection when driving a truck without a trailer attached. This is commonly referred to as "bobtailing." With bobtail insurance, the tractor is covered at all times, even when it is not attached to a trailer, regardless of whether or not the truck is under dispatch.

Trailer interchange insurance is a must-have if you're involved in a trailer interchange agreement. This essential coverage offers protection for trailers owned by other parties that you're using under a contractual agreement. It covers damages caused by collisions, fire, theft, and vandalism, providing assurance to all parties involved.

Curious whether our commercial truck insurance agency in cityname, state offers additional coverage? The following options can be bound in your insurance policy:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Reefer Breakdown Insurance
  • Occupational Accident with Contract Liability Insurance
  • Rental Reimbursement Insurance
  • Underinsured or Uninsured Motorist Insurance
  • Towing Insurance
  • Electronics Insurance
  • Much More

Three plus 3 Safe Driving Tips to

Lower the Cost of Truck Insurance in Andersonville, GA

Keeping your drivers safe on the road is crucial not only for their own well-being but also for the safety of other motorists and the financial stability of your business. The Department of Labor has identified the trucking industry as one of the most hazardous sectors in the U.S. In fact, trucking and logistics fleets are known for their high injury and fatality rates. By improving how safely your truckers drive, you can help reduce expenses related to claim payouts, accidents, and insurance premium hikes.

Whether you own a large fleet or you're the owner and operator of a single rig, keep these safe driving tips in mind to help lower your insurance costs.

Implement Preventative Maintenance Plans

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

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 Trucking Insurance Andersonville, GA

Practice Defensive Driving

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
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 Commercial Liability Insurance For Truckers Andersonville, GA

Find Ways to Prevent Distracted Driving

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

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 Commercial Truck Insurance Quote Andersonville, GA

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

 Low Priced Commercial Truck Insurance Andersonville, GA phone Call Now

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
Commercial Truck Insurance Andersonville, GA phone Call Now

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

 Truck Insurance Andersonville, GA phone Call Now

check light FAQs About

Independence Insurance Agency

If you're looking for a commercial trucking insurance agency for your business, chances are you have some questions - and we've got answers. Keep reading to learn more about some of the most commonly asked questions we hear from truckers like you.

Why go with a "jack of all trades" when you can work with specialists who focus exclusively on transportation insurance? We have excellent relationships with major trucking insurance carriers and, as such, can provide the best assistance and reasonable rates.

Typically, companies will look at claims that date back three years or less.

We proudly work with more than 20 carriers to provide our clients with the most advantageous options at competitive prices, catering to the needs of owner-operators and big fleets alike.

Permit filings are typically done by insurance companies on the next business day. Federal (FMCSA) filings are completed online and updated immediately, while some states may take up to three weeks to process.

Independence Insurance Agency: Committed to the Trucking Industry

There's no question about it - you've got to protect your staff, your rig, and your trucking business with insurance. But choosing the right insurance partner isn't always easy. Thankfully, with Independence Insurance Agency by your side, you can rest easy knowing you're covered no matter where the road takes you. If you're in need of a commercial truck insurance agency in Andersonville, GA that caters to truckers like you, pick up the phone and contact one of our transportation specialists today. That way, you can get back on the road with confidence tomorrow.

 Trucking Insurance Andersonville, GA

Latest News in Andersonville, GA

Visitors step back into history at Andersonville Historic Fair

ANDERSONVILLE, GA – Visitors from around the region, the state and the southeast got a taste of what life was like back during the Civil War when they came to the 43rd-annual Andersonville Historic Fair on Sunday, October 20. The fair was supposed to have begun on Saturday, October 19, but due to rain, Saturday’s festivities were cancelled.Cynthia StormCaller, head of the Andersonville Guild and curator for the Drummer Boy Civil War Museum, was the overseer for the festivities. “The gates and everything he...

ANDERSONVILLE, GA – Visitors from around the region, the state and the southeast got a taste of what life was like back during the Civil War when they came to the 43rd-annual Andersonville Historic Fair on Sunday, October 20. The fair was supposed to have begun on Saturday, October 19, but due to rain, Saturday’s festivities were cancelled.

Cynthia StormCaller, head of the Andersonville Guild and curator for the Drummer Boy Civil War Museum, was the overseer for the festivities. “The gates and everything help the historic preservation of the town,” StormCaller said. “If you go down to Pioneer Farm, you’ll see what we’re really talking about. We raised almost 13 buildings this past year. These are old buildings from the 1800s. Some are 130 years old. Some are older, but it also invites people to come in and see our little town and the wonderful stores that we have here and everything. This is a boost fore our economy, not just here in Andersonville, but throughout Sumter County.”

StormCaller went on to say that in the past five years, the turnout for the fair has averaged 5,000 to 6,000 people a year. “Because of our wonderful storm yesterday, we didn’t have that much visitation,” StormCaller said.

At the fair, visitors got to see various arts and crafts from various venders. They also got to experience periodic reenactments of small town gunfights and there were periodic reenactments of Civil War battles.

Those who loved music got to experience the beautiful, harmonic sounds of the Dixie Jubilee Band from Woodstock, GA.

As far as food was concerned, there was plenty of it. Visitors could dine at the Anderson Station Confederate Restaurant. They could also get a corn dog, chicken and alligator on a stick.

Visitors could also watch a blacksmith, such as Craig Hines of Whispering Pines Forge & Farm, create a bottle opener out of a piece of scrap metal and they could see how corn meal was grinded up at a grist mill. To sum it up, visitors to the Andersonville Historic Fair got to see everything that involved life in the 1800s and during the Civil War.

There was also a wildlife exhibit for those interested in snakes. Clayton Smith of the Georgia Reptile Society had an exhibit displaying exotic, non-venomous snakes, such as boa constrictors and pythons.

Though the weather didn’t cooperate on Saturday, the visitors who came on Sunday to the 43rd-annual Andersonville Historic Fair had a great time as they took time to experience what life was like back during the 1800s and the Civil War.

Imerys stops operations at Andersonville facility, will reduce production at another

ANDERSONVILLE, GA (WALB) - Operations at two Imerys Oilfield Solutions plants, including one in Andersonville, GA will cease for "an undetermined amount of time" due to the plummeting price of oil.Imerys did not immediately announce how many employees would be affected.The company said it had experienced a "substantial reduction in orders" over the last 60 days, and would "mothball' its facilities in Andersonville. They said they would also reduce production at a plant in Wrens, GA.In a release, ...

ANDERSONVILLE, GA (WALB) - Operations at two Imerys Oilfield Solutions plants, including one in Andersonville, GA will cease for "an undetermined amount of time" due to the plummeting price of oil.

Imerys did not immediately announce how many employees would be affected.

The company said it had experienced a "substantial reduction in orders" over the last 60 days, and would "mothball' its facilities in Andersonville. They said they would also reduce production at a plant in Wrens, GA.

In a release, officials said they would determine at a later date when production would resume.

Imerys employs more than 15,000 people at more than 240 facilities around the world.

A spokesman says the company is trying to relocate some of those employees to another facility in either Georgia or another state, but for now, operations at the Oilfield Solutions facility are mothballed.

The layoffs could affect more than just these families; it could affect local businesses like the Maze.

"Our business is about 80% local and about 20% tourist, so when we lose a company like Imerys, when they lay off people, it really hurts us," said store owner Chuck Smith.

In fact it already has; one lady cancelled her order for specialized frames.

"She'd put in an order for it and she called yesterday and said she just found out she was being laid off and she'd like to put off framing because she can't afford it right now," said Smith.

Smith and other business owners remain hopeful that those without jobs will rebound and find work. Everyone agrees they play a special part in the local economy.

"Lot of the people that work there even though it's 15-20 miles away, live here, and shop here in our community and eat in our community so it'll be a big difference for us," said Smith.

Imerys says operations could resume at the Oilfield Solutions if prices and demand pick back up.

Here is the news release sent from Imerys Oilfield Solutions:

With the plummeting price of oil, and the industry wide slowdown in drilling activity, Imerys Oilfield Solutions (IOS) has experienced a substantial reduction in orders over the last 60 days. As a result of these market conditions, IOS will be mothballing it's facility in Andersonville, Georgia for an undetermined period. At the same time we will be mothballing the Gemini facility, we will also be reducing production at our Wrens facility. As market conditions become more favorable the business will make a determination as to when production would fully resume. These are difficult decisions to make, because we know how this action will impact our people and their families. This is an extremely tough time for everyone involved, but we truly feel that taking this action now will, in the long run, position this business to be competitive long- term. Our continued commitment to servicing our customer base remains strong through this downturn and we will come out of this stronger as an Industry.

New owner will help Wrens plant diversify its product line

For the first since the plummet in crude oil prices tanked the proppant market in 2015, US Ceramics (USC) is firing up its kilns, hiring a variety of new positions and hoping to get its second line operational by September.The Wrens, Ga. plant, formerly known as PyraMax and more recently as Imerys, was recently purchased by First Bauxite LLC (FBX), an acquisition that will allow the plant to expand its product lines to include a full portfolio of proppants for sale on the domestic and international markets, as well as s...

For the first since the plummet in crude oil prices tanked the proppant market in 2015, US Ceramics (USC) is firing up its kilns, hiring a variety of new positions and hoping to get its second line operational by September.

The Wrens, Ga. plant, formerly known as PyraMax and more recently as Imerys, was recently purchased by First Bauxite LLC (FBX), an acquisition that will allow the plant to expand its product lines to include a full portfolio of proppants for sale on the domestic and international markets, as well as several new products that will make use of materials for the highest grade non-metallurgical bauxite reserve in Guyana.

“The acquisition will also permit USC to step into other market segments such as refractories, flame retardants and chemicals that can utilize the special characteristics of the low impurity FBX bauxite,” Thibault Van Stratum, Executive Chair of FBX, said.

FBX also purchased the Andersonville, Ga. kaolin processing facility that was shut down in 2015.

Mike Burgess, who will be moving into the CEO role at US Ceramics, was one of the founders of PyraMax Ceramics and was responsible for the design and build of the Wrens plant. He has been a part of the management team there since the beginning. He was there when it opened in 2013, when Imerys took over, and when sales dropped to nearly zero in 2015.

“We reduced staffing down to one line and sporadically ran that line through 2018,” Burgess said. “It was probably shut down more than it operated during that period.”

In 2019, Burgess and others offered a leveraged management buyout with Imerys remaining as a joint venture partner and US Ceramics was created. The plant, which has always focused on the production of lightweight ceramic proppant, tiny beads used in the oil and gas industry in non-traditional extraction of those resources, retooled the plant to focus on the international market.

Burgess said that while looking for a partner in this venture they found FBX, which plans to keep the US Ceramics name as a fully owned subsidiary as well as key personnel and employees.

“First Bauxite is changing the direction,” Burgess said.

Instead of being totally focused on the light weight proppant market, FBX’s access to high-grade bauxite will allow the Wrens and Andersonville plants to diversify.

“Many of the companies along the kaolin belt in Georgia are also buying bauxite,” Burgess said. “Georgia’s reserves of bauxite are a lower quality and doesn’t have the volume needed for many products. This provides US Ceramics with a source of high-quality bauxite that will now allow us to expand our proppant portfolio to intermediate, high strength and ultra-high strength proppant markets.”

The company has already begun bringing shiploads of bauxite into the Port of Savannah and utilizing local trucking companies to transport it.

“One of the things we do in Wrens, with our high-temperature centering kiln we’re able to calcine and make refractory-grade bauxite aggregate,” Burgess said. “That’s a new product line. We’ll still utilize our bead technology to make these little round beads for oil fields, but we’ll also make those out of bauxite for other industries, like the foundry industry and industrial grinding applications.”

With the Wrens and Andersonville plants utilizing different processing technologies, Burgess said that there is a variety of new product lines the company is exploring.

“The processing capabilities of the two plants will open the door for a replacement to Chinese-produced bauxite at a time when there are major issues with consistent supply from China,” said John Karson, FBX’s Vice President of Sales and Marketing. “Guyana was a leading producer of non-met bauxite until the mid-1980’s when lower quality, but especially lower priced Chinese bauxite, flooded the global market.”

FBX representatives have said that current market conditions have created voids in the supply of many raw materials and Chinese-based materials and goods are being impacted by supply chain issues and other electricity curtailments. It expects that the products planned for the Georgia plants will be the only domestically calcined bauxite on the market that is not produced by a Chinese-owned company.

“The real goal is to utilize their bauxite in combination with the local kaolin in combination with the technology in these two plants to make a diversified portfolio of different products for different industries,” Burgess said.

These products include flame retardants that are used in products like wall board and the carpet industry and materials used in refractory market and alumina industries as well as finished products like foundry beads that can replace sand in those processes. Other product applications include an aggregate used as a high friction surface treatment in highway safety programs.

Burgess said that FBX and USC have completed a 100-day integration process between the two companies and are in the process of restaffing the plant.

“We’ve already restarted one line in Wrens and we’ve made run of proppant and shut it back down. Now we’re in process of starting it up on bauxite,” Burgess said.

Hiring is pretty much across the board with positions needed at entry level as well as experienced production level, supervisor and managerial roles.

“We’ve added a professional in the accounting department and 10 production operators,” Burgess said. “We need another seven in that role right now. We are trying to hire production managers and maintenance managers. We have an open R&D scientist position in our lab.”

The Wrens plant will also serve as the company’s global research and development facility, Burgess said. They hope to have the second line up and running by September there.

The company has hired a manager of operations for the Andersonville plant and they plan to have it operational by the end of the year.

“We were probably in the low 40s (as far as employees go at the Wrens plant) going into this acquisition and we are trying to get to the 60 or 70 range in Wrens. We’ll probably need that amount at Andersonville as well.”

All of these positions should be posted on the US Ceramics website under the section for job opportunities and the company is also posting the positions on Indeed.

“From a company perspective we can’t do it all fast enough,” Burgess said. “All of the approvals have been made, it’s just the process of finding the right people and hiring them.

“We’re getting some great candidates out of the local area. It has always been a great place to work. One of the best decisions we ever made was locating the facility in Wrens and Jefferson County.”

CPV Announces Georgia Solar Project Begins Construction

(CPV) announced construction stage on the 100 MWdc/80MWac CPV Stagecoach Solar facility, located near Andersonville, Georgia. It is expected to be fully operational in early 2024.The amount of clean energy produced by the project will avoid the equivalent of the annual emissions of about 30,000 cars in the U.S. annually, or approximately 140,000 metric tons annually. CPV Stagecoach will be constructed by ...

(CPV) announced construction stage on the 100 MWdc/80MWac CPV Stagecoach Solar facility, located near Andersonville, Georgia. It is expected to be fully operational in early 2024.

The amount of clean energy produced by the project will avoid the equivalent of the annual emissions of about 30,000 cars in the U.S. annually, or approximately 140,000 metric tons annually. CPV Stagecoach will be constructed by Vanguard Energy Partners and create approximately 250-300 construction jobs over the next 21 months.

“We are pleased to bring this project into construction and become part of the Macon County community.” said CPV Executive Vice President Sean Finnerty. CPV Stagecoach Solar is CPV’s second solar project in Macon County, Georgia. About 600 acres of formerly agricultural land will be the future home of CPV’s Stagecoach Solar. The project is expected to produce around 190,000 MWh/year, which will be enough electricity to power approximately 17,000 homes.

Solar projects across the United States were largely on hold until recent actions by the Biden Administration provided much needed relief from uncertain tariff liabilities. The demand for solar panels far exceeds current domestic manufacturing capability, requiring a phased approach for any transition to U.S. based production. This two-year exemption will allow projects to continue to move forward while domestic production expands to meet the growing demand.

“We have very aggressive renewable development goals at the national and state levels that simply can’t afford a protracted delay in renewable power deployments.” said CPV Executive Vice President Sean Finnerty. “We are proud of the role we play in helping to modernize the U.S. power system to a lower carbon, reliable future, but we can’t get there without an investable regulatory framework.”

This is Vanguard’s first project award with CPV.

“We are encouraged by the Administration’s dual solution by providing immediate tariff relief while simultaneously accelerating American solar manufacturing.” said Mike Seelman, Executive Vice President, Vanguard. “These combined initiatives will allow us to expand our workforce nationally as we partner with CPV and our other clients in creating a more sustainable and equitable energy future.”

About CPV

CPV Group LP, a partnership majority owned by OPC Energy Ltd., is uniquely positioned to leverage global technology and financial partnerships to help modernize America’s power generation. Together with our investors, partners, host communities and other key stakeholders, we are driven to improve our energy infrastructure by developing and operating power generation facilities using cutting edge, clean and highly efficient technologies. Headquartered in Silver Spring, MD, with an office in Braintree, MA, the company has ownership interest in 5,500 MW of clean generation across the United States and the company’s Asset Management division manages 7,335 MW of generating facilities in nine states. Our focus on Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) and sustained history of success have enabled us to grow into one of North America’s premier energy companies. For more information: cpv.com and follow CPV on Twitter and LinkedIn.

About Vanguard

Founded in 2007, Vanguard Energy Partners, LLC (Vanguard) is a family business. Headquartered in Somerville NJ. Vanguard is part of the Ferreira Family of Companies. Their family of companies are united by a shared vision of building a diverse and inclusive work environment, delivering the highest quality of work to their clients, and making an impact through their hard work and dedication. Vanguard, a Minority-Owned Business (MBE), is a nationally recognized solar EPC specializing in utility-scale and C&I projects.

Civil War Prisons: A Study in War Psychology

Georgia was home to a number of Confederate prisons during the Civil War (1861-65). Though dwarfed by the shadow of notorious Andersonville Prison, there were fifteen other facilities in the state.These ranged from well-constructed fortifications, such as county ja...

Georgia was home to a number of Confederate prisons during the Civil War (1861-65). Though dwarfed by the shadow of notorious Andersonville Prison, there were fifteen other facilities in the state.

These ranged from well-constructed fortifications, such as county jails, to makeshift installations, such as wooded areas patrolled by armed guards surrounding prisoners. Prison sites were usually selected for their proximity to major transportation routes. Georgia was relatively distant from the battle lines for most of the war, which made it prime ground for incarcerating captured Union soldiers. Conditions at these prisons usually depended on the Confederacy’s military fortunes. Toward the end of the war, as the tide turned against the Confederate army at the battlefront, the government’s ability to supply and provision prisons in Georgia weakened. Conditions deteriorated to the point where prisoners were attempting to survive without the food, clothing, and shelter needed for sustenance.

One of the first prisons to hold Union soldiers in Georgia was the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta. This facility, built before the war, was large enough to serve as a holding area for more than 150 prisoners in early 1862. The prisoners had been sent to Atlanta to relieve overcrowding at sites in Richmond, Virginia—the same reason such larger prisons as Andersonville later came into existence. On several occasions throughout the war, makeshift facilities were used in and around Atlanta before prisoners were transferred to other sites farther south. This was especially true as large campaigns in both Virginia and Georgia in 1864 swelled the numbers captured.

Also in 1862, a prison pen, known as Camp Oglethorpe, was opened in Macon. Wedged between railroad tracks and the Ocmulgee River, the site was enclosed by a rough stockade on fifteen to twenty acres. Nearly 1,000 prisoners arrived in May to find several buildings within, including one large enough to use as a hospital. The prisoners were a mixture of officers and enlisted men. Their living quarters consisted of sheds or stalls already on site or shelters constructed from materials found within the stockade. As a result of a formal exchange cartel agreed on by the combating powers, most of these prisoners gained their freedom, and by the beginning of 1863, Camp Oglethorpe was nearly abandoned.

The breakdown of prisoner exchanges, combined with Union general William T. Sherman’s Georgia campaign, forced the Confederacy to reopen the facility as an officers’ prison. By the summer of 1864, more than 2,300 Union officers were housed there. Shelter was barely adequate, and rations consisted of beans, cornmeal, and rice in meager amounts. The lack of sanitation, coupled with a dwindling diet, led to the usual litany of such diseases as chronic dysentery and scurvy. An official death total for the prison is unknown. Most of the prisoners were moved from the Macon facility by late July 1864 because of Union cavalry raids in the general vicinity, although some officers were held there until September.

When Sherman’s Union army took Atlanta on September 2, 1864, Confederate prison authorities knew that Andersonville would be a prime target of any Union thrust into the heartland of Georgia, and they began moving Union prisoners of war to more secure locations. At Camp Davidson, constructed in July 1864 on the grounds of what had been the U.S. Marine Hospital in Savannah, prisoners were confined within a stockade that enclosed part of an orchard. The ample rations were a welcome respite from the horrors of Macon and Andersonville. The camp guards, the First Georgia Volunteers, had once been prisoners of war themselves. Because of overcrowding caused by the influx of Andersonville prisoners in September, a second Savannah prison, for officers, was set up on land adjacent to the city jail. Another stockade was hastily constructed for enlisted men. This structure, along with Camp Davidson, may have held more than 10,000 men, but both had to be abandoned after only a month and a half of use.

The most substantial prison holding former Andersonville captives was Camp Lawton in Millen, located in Jenkins County between Augusta and Savannah. Camp Lawton was a stockade structure enclosing forty-two acres, making it the largest Civil War prison in terms of area. Set only a mile off the Augusta Railroad, the pen was designed to hold up to 40,000 prisoners, although the population never grew to much beyond 10,000. By all accounts the prison at Millen was infinitely better than Andersonville. A generous spring ran north to south through the site, providing a fresh supply of drinking water. Rations were also more plentiful, since the countryside had yet to be scavenged of its food resources. Yet disease and death were not unknown because many of the prisoners were terribly debilitated from their incarceration at Andersonville. During the short time the prison was open, from late September to early November 1864, nearly 500 prisoners succumbed to disease.

As Sherman’s troops approached Millen in the March to the Sea, the prisoners had to be moved yet again. Many of them were sent to South Carolina, and others were sent to Savannah. The exact site of Camp Lawton was not located until 2010, when its discovery by archaeology students at Georgia Southern University made national news. The find was significant because the site, previously unidentified and thus unplundered, yielded an unusually rich cache of artifacts left by prisoners and their guards. Researchers believe that many of the artifacts are possessions dropped by prisoners as they were forced onto trains during the camp’s final evacuation.

From Savannah approximately 5,000 prisoners were transported down the Atlantic and Gulf Coast Railroad to Blackshear. This camp was basically a makeshift guard line with accompanying artillery pieces surrounding several thousand men in the piney woods of southeast Georgia. As might be expected, escapes were frequent, discipline lax, and resources scarce. The Blackshear area held prisoners for less than a month, from late November to early December. The collapse of the Confederate infrastructure caused much confusion about what exactly to do with these prisoners. Some were shipped back to South Carolina, but the majority went southwest to Thomasville, where the Atlantic and Gulf rail line ended. Impressed enslaved laborers from nearby plantations constructed yet another stockade.

The prison at Thomasville was located half a mile northwest of town, on a five-acre tract surrounded by a ditch six feet deep and ten feet wide. Planned as a temporary holding area, the site was occupied for only two weeks in December 1864. During that time approximately 5,000 Union prisoners were confined there. The men were allowed to construct their own shelters from existing timber within the site. Exposure to the elements and close quarters caused an outbreak of smallpox, which claimed the lives of hundreds of prisoners. Confederate authorities soon ordered the site to be abandoned, and the decision was made to send all of Thomasville’s prisoners back to Andersonville. This meant a sixty-mile march north to Albany, where they reembarked on the Southwestern Railroad. This line took them back to Andersonville, where they arrived on Christmas Eve 1864.

Though at present Andersonville is a National Historic Site, little has been done to commemorate other Civil War prison sites in Georgia. State historic markers have been erected at Blackshear and Thomasville. Magnolia Springs State Park now incorporates the area of Camp Lawton, including some historic earthworks. Other prison sites, such as those in Atlanta and Savannah, have been destroyed by development.

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