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Frame The Importance of

Commercial Truck Insurance in Florence, SC

  • Let's face it - truckers in America have always been the backbone of our great country. They still are in modern times. On any given day, thousands of trucks traverse our highways and local roads, delivering goods and products on time so that businesses and consumers have what they need to live life. And while commercial trucking can be an incredibly lucrative way to make a living and put food on the table, it can also be risky and expensive.
  • Whether you're the owner of a fleet, an independent trucker, or have a business that uses big rigs to transport goods, you need commercial trucking insurance to protect you and your client's investments, shield you from liability, and more.
  • That's where working with a reliable truck insurance agency comes into play. Unfortunately, for many commercial truck insurance providers, serving the needs of truckers is low on the proverbial totem pole. At Independence Insurance Agency, nothing could be further from the truth.

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Insurance Agency in Florence, SC You Can Trust

Much like you pride yourself on running a successful trucking business, Independence Insurance Agency prides itself on its years of experience providing truck insurance for hardworking men and women across the country. And in our experience, insurance rates for truckers are just too high - so high, in fact, that they eat away at their bottom line, making it more difficult to run a business and make a profit. Fortunately, at Independence Insurance Agency, we provide truckers the freedom they need from astronomically high insurance rates so they can stay on the road and keep driving America forward.

As one of the most trusted commercial trucking insurance agencies in the U.S., we understand the challenges that you face daily as a trucker. We also know how important it is to protect your business. That's why we go above and beyond to find you the best-priced coverage available, whether you're an operator, own a small fleet, a large fleet, or something in between.

Commercial Truck Insurance Florence, SC

We Put Truckers First Because Others Don't

 Truck Insurance Florence, SC

Truckers across the country choose to work with Independence Insurance Agency because we put their needs first before anything else. As experts in transportation insurance, we proudly offer a range of quality insurance products that are both practical and affordable for them. Our industry-leading carriers provide coverage that caters to the unique challenges faced by the trucking industry, ensuring that your business is protected at all times.

At our core, we are committed to finding the best possible price for your coverage without compromising the quality of service you deserve. The truth is, we understand how essential truckers are to the United States and take pride in making their insurance experience more streamlined and affordable.

One way we do so is by simplifying the insurance process. Our transportation specialists take the time to understand your specific needs and budget to tailor a comprehensive plan that works for you. You won't ever have to worry about cookie-cutter plans or uninterested agents when you work with our commercial trucking insurance agency. We take an educational approach to ensure that the entire big rig insurance process is quick, painless, and easy to understand. If there's something you don't understand, we're happy to take the time to explain. After all, the success and safety of your business are on the line.

Looking to the future, we are committed to providing innovative new products that cater to the ever-changing needs of truck drivers. As your one-stop shop for commercial trucking insurance, we are dedicated to your success, one policy at a time.

If you're a commercial trucker looking to ensure your rig, you can rest easy knowing that Independence Insurance Agency provides:

  • Affordable Trucking Insurance Plans for Any Budget
  • Exemplary Customer Service
  • Seasoned Transportation Specialists Who Customize Plans to Your Needs
  • A+ Carriers Across the Country
  • Simple, Easy Quote and Bind Process
  • Multiple Insurance Carriers Quoted to Find You the Best Rates
  • Truck Insurance for New Ventures

Call us or send us a message today to learn more about the best 18-wheeler insurance options for your trucking business.

chart The Commercial Truck

Common Types of Big Rig Truck Insurance in Florence, SC

At Independence Insurance Agency, we offer several types of insurance coverage for local, intermediate, and long-haul trucking needs. Here are just a few categories of trucking insurance coverage that our agency offers.

As the foundation of your insurance policy, liability coverage is required by law in most states in the U.S. It provides coverage for damage or injuries caused to properties or other people if your 18-wheeler is responsible for the crash. Without liability coverage, it's almost impossible to drive a truck or run a trucking business without major legal consequences.

Having physical damage coverage is an essential component that shouldn't be overlooked. This insurance is responsible for covering the expenses related to repairing or replacing your truck in situations such as accidents, theft, vandalism, and other damaging events. By having this coverage, you can rest assured that your business won't be affected significantly by unexpected incidents, and you can continue running your operations smoothly even in challenging times.

For trucking companies, the goods they transport are crucial to their operations. To protect these goods from damage, loss, or theft while in transit, cargo insurance is essential. This coverage provides much-needed peace of mind for both you and your clients, allowing you to reimburse clients for any losses sustained while protecting your reputation and brand identity.

Non-Trucking Liability Insurance is designed to cover property damage or bodily injury that may occur during personal time when the driver/truck is not under dispatch. This coverage can be applied with or without a trailer and is added to a commercial policy as an endorsement.

While Independence Insurance Agency has built a reputation of excellence in serving the needs of truckers, we also offer general liability. Also known as Truckers General Liability, this coverage insures for bodily injuries or property damage that happen due to business activities that are NOT the cause of operating a truck. It covers accidents that occur in parking lots, rest stops, also while loading or unloading. General liability can also cover losses related to theft and vandalism. Most brokers and shippers will require this coverage to work with you.

Bobtail insurance is a type of coverage that is comparable to non-trucking liability, which is designed to offer protection when driving a truck without a trailer attached. This is commonly referred to as "bobtailing." With bobtail insurance, the tractor is covered at all times, even when it is not attached to a trailer, regardless of whether or not the truck is under dispatch.

Trailer interchange insurance is a must-have if you're involved in a trailer interchange agreement. This essential coverage offers protection for trailers owned by other parties that you're using under a contractual agreement. It covers damages caused by collisions, fire, theft, and vandalism, providing assurance to all parties involved.

Curious whether our commercial truck insurance agency in cityname, state offers additional coverage? The following options can be bound in your insurance policy:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Reefer Breakdown Insurance
  • Occupational Accident with Contract Liability Insurance
  • Rental Reimbursement Insurance
  • Underinsured or Uninsured Motorist Insurance
  • Towing Insurance
  • Electronics Insurance
  • Much More

Three plus 3 Safe Driving Tips to

Lower the Cost of Truck Insurance in Florence, SC

Keeping your drivers safe on the road is crucial not only for their own well-being but also for the safety of other motorists and the financial stability of your business. The Department of Labor has identified the trucking industry as one of the most hazardous sectors in the U.S. In fact, trucking and logistics fleets are known for their high injury and fatality rates. By improving how safely your truckers drive, you can help reduce expenses related to claim payouts, accidents, and insurance premium hikes.

Whether you own a large fleet or you're the owner and operator of a single rig, keep these safe driving tips in mind to help lower your insurance costs.

Implement Preventative Maintenance Plans

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

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 Trucking Insurance Florence, SC

Practice Defensive Driving

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
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 Commercial Liability Insurance For Truckers Florence, SC

Find Ways to Prevent Distracted Driving

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

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 Commercial Truck Insurance Quote Florence, SC

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

 Low Priced Commercial Truck Insurance Florence, SC phone Call Now

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
Commercial Truck Insurance Florence, SC phone Call Now

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

 Truck Insurance Florence, SC phone Call Now

check light FAQs About

Independence Insurance Agency

If you're looking for a commercial trucking insurance agency for your business, chances are you have some questions - and we've got answers. Keep reading to learn more about some of the most commonly asked questions we hear from truckers like you.

Why go with a "jack of all trades" when you can work with specialists who focus exclusively on transportation insurance? We have excellent relationships with major trucking insurance carriers and, as such, can provide the best assistance and reasonable rates.

Typically, companies will look at claims that date back three years or less.

We proudly work with more than 20 carriers to provide our clients with the most advantageous options at competitive prices, catering to the needs of owner-operators and big fleets alike.

Permit filings are typically done by insurance companies on the next business day. Federal (FMCSA) filings are completed online and updated immediately, while some states may take up to three weeks to process.

Independence Insurance Agency: Committed to the Trucking Industry

There's no question about it - you've got to protect your staff, your rig, and your trucking business with insurance. But choosing the right insurance partner isn't always easy. Thankfully, with Independence Insurance Agency by your side, you can rest easy knowing you're covered no matter where the road takes you. If you're in need of a commercial truck insurance agency in Florence, SC that caters to truckers like you, pick up the phone and contact one of our transportation specialists today. That way, you can get back on the road with confidence tomorrow.

 Trucking Insurance Florence, SC

Latest News in Florence, SC

SC family featured on ABC’s ‘The Great Christmas Light Fight’

FLORENCE — Ross Shotts rarely has time to stop and watch the people who visit his Christmas display.But when he does, he soaks it all in.He sees a child sitting on her father’s shoulders, head tilted back and mouth agape.He sees a couple holding hands and friends leaning close.He sees a young girl twirling beneath the snow machines, flakes catching in her pigtails.“That was so fun,” she said, stamping her feet in the damp dirt. “Snow everywhere.”That’s what i...

FLORENCE — Ross Shotts rarely has time to stop and watch the people who visit his Christmas display.

But when he does, he soaks it all in.

He sees a child sitting on her father’s shoulders, head tilted back and mouth agape.

He sees a couple holding hands and friends leaning close.

He sees a young girl twirling beneath the snow machines, flakes catching in her pigtails.

“That was so fun,” she said, stamping her feet in the damp dirt. “Snow everywhere.”

That’s what it’s all about, Ross said with a laugh.

The Shotts family — Ross, his wife, Darlene, and her sister, Denise Pate — are behind one of Florence’s best-known holiday light displays: a 5-acre, 300,000-light walking trail.

This year, it takes on a little extra cache as the family competes on ABC’s reality TV show “The Great Christmas Light Fight.”

For the Shotts, it’s evidence that what they’ve built is worth sharing with the rest of the world.

But Florence families have long known the display is something special.

Since 2016, the family has operated the display as Lights 4 Paws, the Florence Area Humane Society’s second-largest fundraiser of the year. Thousands of families visit each holiday season, raising hundreds of thousands of dollars.

“You can’t help but just kind of stand back and admire what they do,” said Liz Parrish, a Humane Society board member who helps organize the event. “We’re lucky to have them in Florence.”

The display is the product of six months of work. On average, the family will spend six hours each day putting things together, Ross said. They do it on their own. It’s a labor of love.

Come Christmastime, the Shotts begin a cycle of almost nonstop work. From Thanksgiving weekend through the end of December, every night is a work night.

You can find Darlene and Pate, wearing fluorescent vests, taking turns with other volunteers to direct traffic. Ross Shotts splits his time between the parking lot and the trail — a quarter-mile path that winds through the woods around the Shotts’ home.

As he patrols the trail, looking for anything amiss, he watches visitors as they take in the light show.

His favorite part is the way the kids’ eyes widen, the small gasps of delight that escape their lips.

Even from the parking lot, Ross can hear the kids laughing and screaming.

“I want them to come in and just have fun, and they do,” he said.

Lights 4 Paws is the culmination of years of decorating.

The Shotts started small, like a normal family: just a few white decorations. After a while, they decided to add some color. Then some more.

Slowly, the display grew — a snowflake here, a Santa there — until the decorations threatened to jump the borders of their one-acre home outside of Charlotte.

Christmas decorating, Ross said, became the family hobby.

By the time the Shotts moved to Darlington a decade ago, they were excited to spread out on two acres. That dream quickly ran aground when the local homeowners association shut down the display.

The Shotts replaced the lights with a “for sale” sign.

In 2014, the family found its 5-acre plot of land in Florence. They built fresh, with Christmas in mind. They traced an imaginary trail through the woods. They had the electrician construct an entire panel for the outdoors.

Now, the Shotts spend half the year setting up and tearing down the display.

The work begins in September, when Ross, Darlene and Pate begin lugging out decorations from the 1,200-square-foot storage barn. On average, they spend six hours each day on the project. They talk, debate where to put different decorations and listen to music (no, not Christmas music).

It’s a grand improvisation. There’s no plan. They put decorations where they look good. Every year it’s a little different.

Ross said the family looks for unique decorations. They want people to see things they’ve never seen before.

Forget Santa in his sleigh. There’s Santa in construction equipment, a rocket, a camper, an outhouse.

There are Christmas cactuses, porcupines and cowboys.

An entire section is devoted to outer space: Little green men stand next to spaceships and a host of Star Wars decorations.

There are Japanese hanging lanterns and yellow lights that dangle, fairy like, from tree limbs.

Walking through the dark wood can feel a bit like walking through another world.

Ross estimated they’ve spent tens of thousands of dollars on decorations. Some years they put $20,000 to $45,000 on a credit card. The December electricity bill alone is about $400 more than usual, which Ross shrugs off as not too bad.

But it’s worth it, both for the Humane Society — a cause the Shotts have devoted countless hours to — and the delight the lights bring to families in Florence.

“It’s a project of pride and love for them, and they do a fantastic job,” Parrish said.

For the families who visit Lights 4 Paws, Christmas wouldn’t be the same without it.

“It’s kind of how I start the season. It’s not Christmas until you see some lights,” Doug Gray said on his second visit of the year to the Shotts’ display.

He took photos beneath the Japanese hanging lanterns as he waited for his son and his friends to arrive. It’s a family tradition to go see the lights at Christmastime, he said.

Mary Schwier has come every year since she was 10 or 11. She’s 18 now. This year, she brought her older sister, Katherine, who recently moved back to Florence.

“I’m still a kid at heart,” Schwier said.

The two women hope to make this a tradition.

Yet the Shotts don’t know how many years they have left in them. Ross is 64. The constant work required of the display is draining. By the end of the year, they’re ready to pack it in and take a break.

“By the end of December we’re whooped,” he said.

Maybe next year will be the last one? But no, not next year, Ross said.

Maybe they’ll just do a little less next year. Or maybe they’ll wait a little longer.

“Four years down the road, three years down the road, five years down the road — whenever we decide that we’re going to quit doing this, that’s gonna be kind of a burden on us,” he said, reflecting on all of the families who’ve come to rely on the display, or the kids who’ve grown up expecting to come see the lights every year.

“It’s gonna be a big effect, I guess if we — when we — do decide to close.”

It might be nice to have their lives back, Ross said. Then again, what would they do with all their spare time?

Well, he said, it might be nice to go see some Christmas lights.

New spot for chicken and fish opens in Florence. Why’s it so angry?

FLORENCE — Florence has quite a few chicken and fish restaurants — but none quite like this.Angry Chicken O’ Fish, located in a small storefront on West Evans Street, officially opened Dec. 7.And it is very, very angry.The takeout-style restaurant is decorated with posters depicting roosters in various states of fury. One, muscled and scowling, crosses his arms. Another wields a baseball bat. Another is positively seething, feathers popping from its body.The sign out front features a chicken wear...

FLORENCE — Florence has quite a few chicken and fish restaurants — but none quite like this.

Angry Chicken O’ Fish, located in a small storefront on West Evans Street, officially opened Dec. 7.

And it is very, very angry.

The takeout-style restaurant is decorated with posters depicting roosters in various states of fury. One, muscled and scowling, crosses his arms. Another wields a baseball bat. Another is positively seething, feathers popping from its body.

The sign out front features a chicken wearing a chef’s hat and hoisting a trident. A fish flops from the point.

Feeling Zhu, the restaurant’s owner, said the branding is a product of her love for chicken and the game Angry Birds. Why not combine the two?

“Some people think I have attitude,” Zhu joked, saying it’s simply her no-nonsense personality. The store’s tagline is “Chicken with attitude.”

Zhu, who is originally from Shanghai has lived in Florence for six years. She and her restaurant partners also operate the food truck PokeTown, which is on temporary hiatus while they get Angry Chicken up and running.

Angry Chicken O’ Fish focuses exclusively on fried chicken and seafood. Zhu said she wants to offer the city something new.

The food, while classically Southern, also incorporates elements of Korean cuisine in the seasoning and sauces, Zhu said.

“It’s a little bit Korean and a little bit American and a little bit Abu Dhabi. It’s kind of a little like a mixed blood,” she said.

Offerings include fried chicken, a wide array of fried seafood — perch, trout, scallops, whiting, oysters, flounder, among others — and various sides.

The meal comes in a compact cardboard box with a glowering chicken on the side.

The ambience is reminiscent of a revitalized warehouse district in the heart of an up-and-coming urban area: stone floors, concrete benches, metal tables and chairs, fluorescent lights, some of which are made to look like bottle caps.

And everywhere you look, there are angry chickens.

Dora Motley, one of the first customers after the ribbon cutting, ordered three chicken wings and two perch filets. The meal came with coleslaw and a can of soda.

Motley said she noticed signs for the new restaurant and headed over after an appointment at the nail salon. She eats out often and likes to try new restaurants when they open.

With the smell of fresh fried chicken wafting through the restaurant, she said she plans to be back.

Angry Chicken O’ Fish is located at 2047 West Evans St. It’s open Sunday through Thursday, 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., and Friday through Saturday, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

‘Here we go again:’ Discolored water a constant problem in Florence

FLORENCE — Kimberly Lewis was having a good morning — right up until she noticed the color of the water.She welcomed her son home from his night shift. She sent her other son to work. She made muffins with her grandchild.When the house finally quieted, she filled up the water jug and stored it in the refrigerator. As she closed the door, a rust-red glint caught her eye.“Here we go again,” she thought.It’s been three months since Florence formed a ...

FLORENCE — Kimberly Lewis was having a good morning — right up until she noticed the color of the water.

She welcomed her son home from his night shift. She sent her other son to work. She made muffins with her grandchild.

When the house finally quieted, she filled up the water jug and stored it in the refrigerator. As she closed the door, a rust-red glint caught her eye.

“Here we go again,” she thought.

It’s been three months since Florence formed a task force to combat issues with discolored water. Officials have apologized for the inconvenience and say they’re doing what they can to stop it, attributing the spike in problems to a combination of construction and temporary maintenance that have stirred up iron deposits.

They say the water is still safe to drink and use largely as usual, despite the disagreeable color.

But the city’s assurances have done little to appease frustrated residents. They have flooded social media with pictures of bathtubs and sinks filled with murky water and raised questions about whether the supply is truly safe.

“If I wanted muddy water, I could go out to the creek and scoop it up,” Lewis said. “I would expect to have muddy water from a creek, not when it comes through a pipe and through a filter system that taxpayers pay for.”

‘No one wants to drink dirty water’

At least three times a week, Lewis’ water turns red. It leaves a rusty ring around the toilet. It turns the laundry brown. Sometimes, Lewis starts a bath for her 5-year old grandson, only to have him come out minutes later to tell her the water is already dirty.

“It really looks like somebody’s probably put a cup of red dirt in there,” Lewis said.

Instead of using the discolored water, she buys water from the grocery store, spending almost a $100 each month. Not even the family dog drinks the water from the faucet these days.

In interviews and on social media, residents described similar experiences. But the precise issue varied. Some said the water was brown or yellow. Others said it had a strange smell. Sometimes the discoloration is constant, while other times it only happens occasionally. Many said they’ve had problems before, but nothing this bad. This is new.

City officials are well aware of the problem, and they’ve been working on it for months.

In August, the city assembled a Water Quality Team to respond to a spike in complaints.

In June, complaints doubled to 90 after an average of 46 complaints each month over the previous year. In August, 109 people complained. Complaints fell off in September before rebounding to 124 in October.

While there had always been isolated issues with discolored water in certain areas, those issues multiplied and spread across the city, City Manager Randy Osterman said at the time.

“We understand their frustration. We apologize for their inconvenience. We get it. No one wants to drink dirty water,” Osterman said.

Graphic: Poor water quality complaints in Florence, SC

Florence began to receive very high call volumes beginning in June of 2023, though complaints declined dramatically in September. In October, the reports became less isolated in the west and southwest areas of the distribution system and more random, according to the city. In October, three major line breaks occurred and the West Florence Fire District conducted annual hydrant checks and flushing, which contributed to disruptions to the system.

The Post and Courier | SOURCE: CITY OF FLORENCE

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Graphic: Poor water quality complaints in Florence, SC

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The task force is composed of more than 20 people, including city staff and outside engineers with water expertise.

Utilities Director Jerry Dudley said the city has made some progress in understanding and addressing the problem, though work is ongoing.

Here are the basics:

Florence uses a combination of water from an underground aquifer and the Pee Dee River. The groundwater has a high proportion of iron, a geological quirk of the area. Small particles of the iron regularly make their way into the system.

Under normal circumstances, the iron settles at the bottom of the waterlines, much the same way that salt settles at the bottom of a cooking pot.

But when the system is disturbed — say, if a line is hit during construction or the pressure in the pipes changes — the iron floats up and is carried into homes.

Normally, Florence officials say, that’s a minor problem. But a recent chain of events has made it a major one.

First, construction on Alligator Road has caused disturbances. Contractors have damaged lines, and even the mere presence of heavy machinery can vibrate the water line and stir up iron.

Second, two wells and a plant have been offline due to maintenance issues. That means the system can’t operate normally as usual.

Dudley said officials have started working on solutions, but he repeatedly emphasized the city needs residents’ help to identify all of the problems.

Staff can’t address an issue if they don’t know about it, and the more data they have, the more likely they can develop a fix. Problems may also be unique to an individual home, not part of the systemic issue officials are seeing, Dudley said.

“We really need to know these things, too, because it helps us improve when we know what’s going on out there and know they’re having problems and where the problems are occurring,” Dudley said.

Of the five people who spoke with The Post and Courier, not everyone routinely reported their issues — or reported them at all.

Two of them had not called the city, despite dealing with discolored water for months on end. Another called just once when the problem began and hasn’t checked in since.

Lewis called in every problem she saw when the discoloration began several months ago. But as the problem persisted and city staff could only provide temporary fixes, her calls trailed off.

“I gave up,” she said.

Is it safe?

When Katie Barnes bathes her kids, she often wonders whether the water is safe.

Ever since she moved into her new home several months ago, Barnes’ water has come out brown and gritty.

She wonders if, several decades down the road, her children will have some rare health defect or an increased risk of disease caused by something lurking in the water, something that officials didn’t know about or didn’t understand.

“I’m super concerned,” she said. “I don’t know what’s in that, you know?”

Florence Co. Council approves 60-day ordinance moratorium against new sand mines

FLORENCE, SC (WPDE) — Florence County Council approved an emergency ordinance on Monday placing a 60-day moratorium against new sand mines in the county.The South Carolina Department of Environmental Control (DHEC) received an application for a mine operating permit to mine sand from a 260-acre site near the Salem area of lower Florence County.This will be one of the biggest sand mines in the state of South Carolina with the proposed maximum depth of 50 feet.TRENDING:...

FLORENCE, SC (WPDE) — Florence County Council approved an emergency ordinance on Monday placing a 60-day moratorium against new sand mines in the county.

The South Carolina Department of Environmental Control (DHEC) received an application for a mine operating permit to mine sand from a 260-acre site near the Salem area of lower Florence County.

This will be one of the biggest sand mines in the state of South Carolina with the proposed maximum depth of 50 feet.

TRENDING: Inlet Square Mall set for major redevelopment in 2-year plan

Many community members are concerned about the project and expressed the mine could be dangerous.

Community member, David Yanello who lives near the area of the proposed mine said he and his neighbors are worried about the noise and traffic the mine would cause, along with its hours of operation.

There’s families that live here. There’s children that live on these roads back here, elderly people that go out here to walk these roads and a 30,000 pound truck trailing 30 or 40 mph takes a long time to stop so there’s some safety concerns as well. Bottom line is I don’t think the community really wants this mine here.

ABC15 spoke with Florence County Councilman Jason Springs who said the moratorium will give them time to conduct studies and potentially develop regulations.

NEW: NMB council opts out of 'forever chemicals' settlement

Springs also says he’ll do everything in his power to protect the people of Florence County.

So we’ve imposed this temporary moratorium to give us time to study to see what our options are. This is some thing that is moving pretty fas. We didn’t find out about it until late in the process so we’re trying to figure out what we can do to either limit over and make this a more reasonable project.

There will be a "Save Our Sand" public meeting and formal public hearing next Thursday at 6 p.m. at Hannah-Pamplico Elementary Middle School Cafeteria.

ABC15 will keep you posted on any new developments.

Florence Co. Council approves 60-day ordinance moratorium against new sand mines

FLORENCE, SC (WPDE) — Florence County Council approved an emergency ordinance on Monday placing a 60-day moratorium against new sand mines in the county.The South Carolina Department of Environmental Control (DHEC) received an application for a mine operating permit to mine sand from a 260-acre site near the Salem area of lower Florence County.This will be one of the biggest sand mines in the state of South Carolina with the proposed maximum depth of 50 feet.TRENDING:...

FLORENCE, SC (WPDE) — Florence County Council approved an emergency ordinance on Monday placing a 60-day moratorium against new sand mines in the county.

The South Carolina Department of Environmental Control (DHEC) received an application for a mine operating permit to mine sand from a 260-acre site near the Salem area of lower Florence County.

This will be one of the biggest sand mines in the state of South Carolina with the proposed maximum depth of 50 feet.

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Many community members are concerned about the project and expressed the mine could be dangerous.

Community member, David Yanello who lives near the area of the proposed mine said he and his neighbors are worried about the noise and traffic the mine would cause, along with its hours of operation.

There’s families that live here. There’s children that live on these roads back here, elderly people that go out here to walk these roads and a 30,000 pound truck trailing 30 or 40 mph takes a long time to stop so there’s some safety concerns as well. Bottom line is I don’t think the community really wants this mine here.

ABC15 spoke with Florence County Councilman Jason Springs who said the moratorium will give them time to conduct studies and potentially develop regulations.

NEW: NMB council opts out of 'forever chemicals' settlement

Springs also says he’ll do everything in his power to protect the people of Florence County.

So we’ve imposed this temporary moratorium to give us time to study to see what our options are. This is some thing that is moving pretty fas. We didn’t find out about it until late in the process so we’re trying to figure out what we can do to either limit over and make this a more reasonable project.

There will be a "Save Our Sand" public meeting and formal public hearing next Thursday at 6 p.m. at Hannah-Pamplico Elementary Middle School Cafeteria.

ABC15 will keep you posted on any new developments.

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