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Frame The Importance of

Commercial Truck Insurance in Halifax, NC

  • Let's face it - truckers in America have always been the backbone of our great country. They still are in modern times. On any given day, thousands of trucks traverse our highways and local roads, delivering goods and products on time so that businesses and consumers have what they need to live life. And while commercial trucking can be an incredibly lucrative way to make a living and put food on the table, it can also be risky and expensive.
  • Whether you're the owner of a fleet, an independent trucker, or have a business that uses big rigs to transport goods, you need commercial trucking insurance to protect you and your client's investments, shield you from liability, and more.
  • That's where working with a reliable truck insurance agency comes into play. Unfortunately, for many commercial truck insurance providers, serving the needs of truckers is low on the proverbial totem pole. At Independence Insurance Agency, nothing could be further from the truth.

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percent The Commercial Truck

Insurance Agency in Halifax, NC You Can Trust

Much like you pride yourself on running a successful trucking business, Independence Insurance Agency prides itself on its years of experience providing truck insurance for hardworking men and women across the country. And in our experience, insurance rates for truckers are just too high - so high, in fact, that they eat away at their bottom line, making it more difficult to run a business and make a profit. Fortunately, at Independence Insurance Agency, we provide truckers the freedom they need from astronomically high insurance rates so they can stay on the road and keep driving America forward.

As one of the most trusted commercial trucking insurance agencies in the U.S., we understand the challenges that you face daily as a trucker. We also know how important it is to protect your business. That's why we go above and beyond to find you the best-priced coverage available, whether you're an operator, own a small fleet, a large fleet, or something in between.

Commercial Truck Insurance Halifax, NC

We Put Truckers First Because Others Don't

 Truck Insurance Halifax, NC

Truckers across the country choose to work with Independence Insurance Agency because we put their needs first before anything else. As experts in transportation insurance, we proudly offer a range of quality insurance products that are both practical and affordable for them. Our industry-leading carriers provide coverage that caters to the unique challenges faced by the trucking industry, ensuring that your business is protected at all times.

At our core, we are committed to finding the best possible price for your coverage without compromising the quality of service you deserve. The truth is, we understand how essential truckers are to the United States and take pride in making their insurance experience more streamlined and affordable.

One way we do so is by simplifying the insurance process. Our transportation specialists take the time to understand your specific needs and budget to tailor a comprehensive plan that works for you. You won't ever have to worry about cookie-cutter plans or uninterested agents when you work with our commercial trucking insurance agency. We take an educational approach to ensure that the entire big rig insurance process is quick, painless, and easy to understand. If there's something you don't understand, we're happy to take the time to explain. After all, the success and safety of your business are on the line.

Looking to the future, we are committed to providing innovative new products that cater to the ever-changing needs of truck drivers. As your one-stop shop for commercial trucking insurance, we are dedicated to your success, one policy at a time.

If you're a commercial trucker looking to ensure your rig, you can rest easy knowing that Independence Insurance Agency provides:

  • Affordable Trucking Insurance Plans for Any Budget
  • Exemplary Customer Service
  • Seasoned Transportation Specialists Who Customize Plans to Your Needs
  • A+ Carriers Across the Country
  • Simple, Easy Quote and Bind Process
  • Multiple Insurance Carriers Quoted to Find You the Best Rates
  • Truck Insurance for New Ventures

Call us or send us a message today to learn more about the best 18-wheeler insurance options for your trucking business.

chart The Commercial Truck

Common Types of Big Rig Truck Insurance in Halifax, NC

At Independence Insurance Agency, we offer several types of insurance coverage for local, intermediate, and long-haul trucking needs. Here are just a few categories of trucking insurance coverage that our agency offers.

As the foundation of your insurance policy, liability coverage is required by law in most states in the U.S. It provides coverage for damage or injuries caused to properties or other people if your 18-wheeler is responsible for the crash. Without liability coverage, it's almost impossible to drive a truck or run a trucking business without major legal consequences.

Having physical damage coverage is an essential component that shouldn't be overlooked. This insurance is responsible for covering the expenses related to repairing or replacing your truck in situations such as accidents, theft, vandalism, and other damaging events. By having this coverage, you can rest assured that your business won't be affected significantly by unexpected incidents, and you can continue running your operations smoothly even in challenging times.

For trucking companies, the goods they transport are crucial to their operations. To protect these goods from damage, loss, or theft while in transit, cargo insurance is essential. This coverage provides much-needed peace of mind for both you and your clients, allowing you to reimburse clients for any losses sustained while protecting your reputation and brand identity.

Non-Trucking Liability Insurance is designed to cover property damage or bodily injury that may occur during personal time when the driver/truck is not under dispatch. This coverage can be applied with or without a trailer and is added to a commercial policy as an endorsement.

While Independence Insurance Agency has built a reputation of excellence in serving the needs of truckers, we also offer general liability. Also known as Truckers General Liability, this coverage insures for bodily injuries or property damage that happen due to business activities that are NOT the cause of operating a truck. It covers accidents that occur in parking lots, rest stops, also while loading or unloading. General liability can also cover losses related to theft and vandalism. Most brokers and shippers will require this coverage to work with you.

Bobtail insurance is a type of coverage that is comparable to non-trucking liability, which is designed to offer protection when driving a truck without a trailer attached. This is commonly referred to as "bobtailing." With bobtail insurance, the tractor is covered at all times, even when it is not attached to a trailer, regardless of whether or not the truck is under dispatch.

Trailer interchange insurance is a must-have if you're involved in a trailer interchange agreement. This essential coverage offers protection for trailers owned by other parties that you're using under a contractual agreement. It covers damages caused by collisions, fire, theft, and vandalism, providing assurance to all parties involved.

Curious whether our commercial truck insurance agency in cityname, state offers additional coverage? The following options can be bound in your insurance policy:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Reefer Breakdown Insurance
  • Occupational Accident with Contract Liability Insurance
  • Rental Reimbursement Insurance
  • Underinsured or Uninsured Motorist Insurance
  • Towing Insurance
  • Electronics Insurance
  • Much More

Three plus 3 Safe Driving Tips to

Lower the Cost of Truck Insurance in Halifax, NC

Keeping your drivers safe on the road is crucial not only for their own well-being but also for the safety of other motorists and the financial stability of your business. The Department of Labor has identified the trucking industry as one of the most hazardous sectors in the U.S. In fact, trucking and logistics fleets are known for their high injury and fatality rates. By improving how safely your truckers drive, you can help reduce expenses related to claim payouts, accidents, and insurance premium hikes.

Whether you own a large fleet or you're the owner and operator of a single rig, keep these safe driving tips in mind to help lower your insurance costs.

Implement Preventative Maintenance Plans

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

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 Trucking Insurance Halifax, NC

Practice Defensive Driving

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
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 Commercial Liability Insurance For Truckers Halifax, NC

Find Ways to Prevent Distracted Driving

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

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 Commercial Truck Insurance Quote Halifax, NC

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

 Low Priced Commercial Truck Insurance Halifax, NC phone Call Now

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
Commercial Truck Insurance Halifax, NC phone Call Now

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

 Truck Insurance Halifax, NC phone Call Now

check light FAQs About

Independence Insurance Agency

If you're looking for a commercial trucking insurance agency for your business, chances are you have some questions - and we've got answers. Keep reading to learn more about some of the most commonly asked questions we hear from truckers like you.

Why go with a "jack of all trades" when you can work with specialists who focus exclusively on transportation insurance? We have excellent relationships with major trucking insurance carriers and, as such, can provide the best assistance and reasonable rates.

Typically, companies will look at claims that date back three years or less.

We proudly work with more than 20 carriers to provide our clients with the most advantageous options at competitive prices, catering to the needs of owner-operators and big fleets alike.

Permit filings are typically done by insurance companies on the next business day. Federal (FMCSA) filings are completed online and updated immediately, while some states may take up to three weeks to process.

Independence Insurance Agency: Committed to the Trucking Industry

There's no question about it - you've got to protect your staff, your rig, and your trucking business with insurance. But choosing the right insurance partner isn't always easy. Thankfully, with Independence Insurance Agency by your side, you can rest easy knowing you're covered no matter where the road takes you. If you're in need of a commercial truck insurance agency in Halifax, NC that caters to truckers like you, pick up the phone and contact one of our transportation specialists today. That way, you can get back on the road with confidence tomorrow.

 Trucking Insurance Halifax, NC

Latest News in Halifax, NC

‘Traumatic event.’ Car slams into 10th-grader getting off school bus, NC officials say

A student was hit by a car while getting off a school bus, causing serious injuries, North Carolina officials told news outlets.The 10th-grade student was taken to a hospital for treatment after the crash on Wednes...

A student was hit by a car while getting off a school bus, causing serious injuries, North Carolina officials told news outlets.

The 10th-grade student was taken to a hospital for treatment after the crash on Wednesday, March 15, in Halifax County, according to WNCN and a post from Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School Principal Melissa Richardson.

“Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School has experienced a traumatic event that has deeply affected us,” Richardson wrote on Facebook.

“At this time, I ask that you please join me in keeping this student and his family in your thoughts and prayers today and in the coming days while we remain hopeful for a full recovery.”

The 17-year-old was exiting a school bus at about 4:30 p.m. when a Tesla going in the opposite direction slammed into him, according to WRAL. The incident reportedly happened while the high schooler was crossing N.C. Highway 561 in Halifax County, roughly 80 miles northeast of Raleigh.

At the time of the crash, N.C. State Highway Patrol said the school bus had its stop arm down. The Tesla driver was “charged with passing a (stopped) school bus striking a person and reckless driving,” WRAL reported.

After the crash, Richardson said Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School has been in contact with law enforcement and announced that school would be dismissed early on March 16.

“Please know that our student support services team are available at the school to assist any students or staff who may need special attention or support,” Richardson wrote, adding that officials wouldn’t be providing further details about the crash or the student’s condition.

Haliwa-Saponi Tribal School on its website says it aims to provide learning opportunities while reflecting the “vibrant energy of the Haliwa-Saponi Tribe.”

“The name Haliwa is derived from the two counties of Halifax and Warren, which are the ancestral homelands of the Saponi People dating back to the early 18th century,” the tribe wrote on its website.

A state trooper wasn’t immediately available to respond to McClatchy News’ questions about the crash on March 16.

Rural NC communities get new state funding that will create 321 jobs

By Isabel SoissonOctober 23, 2023The North Carolina Rural Infrastructure Authority (RIA) has approved seven grant requests totaling $2.6 million, which, once distributed, will create a total of 321 jobs in rural communities across the state, 191 of which were previously announced.These grants will go towards creating jobs...

By Isabel Soisson

October 23, 2023

The North Carolina Rural Infrastructure Authority (RIA) has approved seven grant requests totaling $2.6 million, which, once distributed, will create a total of 321 jobs in rural communities across the state, 191 of which were previously announced.

These grants will go towards creating jobs in rural areas of six counties across the state of North Carolina: Chatham County, Pitt County, Wayne County, Halifax County, Stanly County, and Nash County.

“When we invest in our rural communities, we uplift the state of North Carolina as a whole,” Governor Roy Cooper said in a statement. “These grants not only improve our state’s infrastructure, but offer rural residents a chance at greater economic opportunity, stability, and freedom through quality jobs.”

Five of the grants were issued through the state’s Building Reuse Program, which provides grants to local governments to renovate, expand, and construct buildings that will be used for a variety of purposes, from housing manufacturing companies to health care facilities.

A $375,000 grant will support the reuse of a 227,700-square-foot building in New London. Clayton Supply, Inc.—a home manufacturer that builds, supplies, sells, finances, and leases homes—plans to establish a location at this facility once construction is finished. This project will create 263 jobs overall.

In Halifax County, a $500,000 grant will be used to support the reuse of a building in Roanoke Rapids. Five Goods, Inc., a company that focuses on food importation and wholesaling, plans to establish a location at this facility; the construction of this facility is expected to create 50 jobs.

A $350,000 grant will support the 29,000-square-foot expansion of a building in Mount Olive that’s home to Goshen Engineering, Inc., an industrial automation company that focuses on designing and building custom equipment for industrial and commercial sectors, including food production, automotive, and electronics. This project is expected to create 40 jobs.

In Chatham County, $100,000 of the grant money will be used to renovate a 204,832-square-foot building in Goldston. The building is occupied by Conveyor Tech, LLC, a manufacturer of equipment in the electronics assembly industry. This project is expected to create 20 jobs.

A $180,000 grant will go towards renovating a 92,000-square-foot building in Greenville that’s occupied by Catalent Pharma Solutions, a company that specializes in the formulation of packaging for medical products. This project is also expected to create 20 jobs.

The RIA also approved two grants under the Industrial Development Fund – Utility Account Program. This program provides grants to local governments located in the 80 most economically distressed counties of the state. The funds are then used for publicly-owned infrastructure projects that are expected to create jobs.

In Nash County, a $750,000 grant will assist with the creation of a lift station—which is designed to move wastewater from lower to higher elevation through pipes—and additional sewer line expansion for Middlesex Corporate Centre. Once completed, this construction will open up more than 170 additional acres of the park for industrial usage.

A $384,793 grant will assist the Town of New London in Stanly County with expanding access to their municipal sewer system. In addition to allowing for the creation of a new connection to the sewer, the project will also expand the sewer line enabling Heibar, a site-building division of Clayton Homes, to expand operations. Ultimately, this project will provide sewer access to multiple parcels of adjoining land for future use.

According to a press release, the public investment in these projects will attract more than $53.7 million in private investment.

“Our rural infrastructure grants are tangible investments in the full potential of our state and its people,” North Carolina Commerce Secretary Machelle Baker Sanders said in a statement. “Better public infrastructure welcomes more businesses and jobs to North Carolina, while inclusive economic development grows our economy and fosters an increased quality of life for our people.”

Author

Readers overwhelmingly support Carolina Crossroads casino bid

We would describe the results of our recent October casino poll as having more votes cast in it than in a typical Halifax County municipal election — 1,674 in favor, 381 against and 43 undecided — nearly 4.5 times more people favoring a casino in the Carolina Crossroads Entertainment District than those who oppose it.Voting is now closed as we have pulled our poll from the website as we planned after the last day of October.With it now established that the casino issue will again be brought up by legislators in thei...

We would describe the results of our recent October casino poll as having more votes cast in it than in a typical Halifax County municipal election — 1,674 in favor, 381 against and 43 undecided — nearly 4.5 times more people favoring a casino in the Carolina Crossroads Entertainment District than those who oppose it.

Voting is now closed as we have pulled our poll from the website as we planned after the last day of October.

With it now established that the casino issue will again be brought up by legislators in their short session beginning April 24, there is much work to do on the local level to lobby lawmakers to choose Roanoke Rapids as a location.

As we have previously editorialized, we believe Carolina Crossroads is the perfect place for this private investment project — adequate land, all the required infrastructure, a renewed interest in the former Roanoke Rapids Theatre after its sale, and an interstate from which it is visible from both travel lanes.

All the land uses are in place at Carolina Crossroads that would allow other things beyond casinos — hotels, waterparks, restaurants and similar attractions — with more than 7,000 feet of road frontage along the interstate and more than 350 acres of developable land.

We believe this matter is not so much about people being able to do with their money what they please, but the catalyst it could provide to bring more economic development here. Sure, that will possibly include more eating, retail and commercial establishments but with an economic vibrancy that hasn’t been seen here since the textiles mills closed we can’t discount that at least one or two industries may see the area in a more favorable light since leaders decided to take this step to help the area improve.

What has been in discussion by state lawmakers is not a fly-by-night proposal in which someone sets up fishing tables or sweepstakes cafes in a strip mall, but people making a required $500 million investment for a stand alone casino and hotel.

This is private investment that requires no local government matching funds that has typically been the case in past economic development projects.

Before Halifax County commissioners deadlocked on a resolution supporting the efforts of Roanoke Rapids to land a casino in Carolina Crossroads — after they initially rejected the proposal — they were told the taxes that would be generated to Halifax County are $3.8 million a year and for Roanoke Rapids $3.3 million a year.

Excise taxes based on gross casino revenue would generate $3,375,000 a year in Halifax County.

The casino would represent $57 million in new payroll revenues a year which would generate new retail sales for the county and communities.

That would benefit Halifax County to the tune of $8.4 million a year, Roanoke Rapids $2.3 million a year and other entities, which would include municipalities over $600,000 a year.

Several boards and commissions which have influence in economic development matters in Halifax County have already endorsed the concept of a Carolina Crossroads casino — factors that should not be not be ignored by state lawmakers when the issue is revisited in the short session.

And we would humbly ask that they also take a look at our poll results — one that has had more votes than you would typically see in a Halifax County municipal election — Editor

Underwater ghost town: NC lake covers 'lost city' with links to Underground Railroad

Many of North Carolina's manmade, recreational lakes have entire ghost towns hidden beneath their surface.However, one lost town in particular has an incredible story of a clever woman who escaped slavery in the 1800s and became a fugitive brewer that created beer so memorable it's still honored by brewers today.The town where she lived in freedom, making a living on her beloved ale, was known as Rock Landing. Oddly, unlike the mill towns and farmland that we so often find beneath lakes, Rock Landing was apparently known for be...

Many of North Carolina's manmade, recreational lakes have entire ghost towns hidden beneath their surface.

However, one lost town in particular has an incredible story of a clever woman who escaped slavery in the 1800s and became a fugitive brewer that created beer so memorable it's still honored by brewers today.

The town where she lived in freedom, making a living on her beloved ale, was known as Rock Landing. Oddly, unlike the mill towns and farmland that we so often find beneath lakes, Rock Landing was apparently known for being pretty metropolitan for its time, according to Steven Lassiter Green-Hockaday, a historian who has been doing research on the role of the Underground Railroad in Rock Landing.

"It was supposed to be the next New York or Philadelphia," said Green-Hockaday. "Rock Landing was at the beginning of the Roanoke Canal, which was a big deal in 1817."

This would have made Rock Landing a center of shipping in North Carolina, bringing in wealth and people from all over the country.

It also made the town an ideal place for those escaping slavery to hide – because the Roanoke Canal and Roanoke River in Halifax County are both known for their major roles as 'freedom roads,' helping enslaved men and women escape slavery from this area of the state. Even today, Halifax County is the only place in NC with three registered historic sites on the National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom. These are places where visitors can touch tangible remnants of this painful and powerful past.

Tunnels, jails and canals: Remnants of the Underground Railroad still exist in Halifax County

Patsy Young: 'Fugitive brewer' escapes slavery, serves ale to Roanoke Canal workers from Rock Landing

Before her freedom, Young was known as Piety. Twice in her life, she escaped from Nathaniel Hunt's plantation in Franklin County. First, when she was 16. Then again, several years later, she escaped again, bringing her young daughter with her.

Escaping slavery was so dangerous that experts in Underground Railroad history say many enslaved men and women chose not to escape. Some felt they were not physically capable of making the journey. Others were afraid to leave their families. Still others were unsure how they'd make a living once off the plantation.

Young escaping as a mother with a 4-year-old daughter would have carried extreme risk – but the risk was worth her freedom. Plus, she knew exactly how she would make money and build a life for herself and her daughter, Eliza.

During her time in slavery, Young's cooking and brewing became extremely popular, allowing her enslaver to make a lot of money on her skills, according to storyteller and historic interpreter Jackie Ruffin, who plays Young and shares a 'firsthand account' of her escape into freedom -- and fame as a brewer.

"I heard about free people of color, able to work on the Roanoke Canal, and I wanted that job," said Ruffin, while in character as Young.

Aware of how much money her talents were worth, Young escaped the Franklin County plantation and ran for Halifax, which was known as a place with a large population of free Black families and abolitionists for the Underground Railroad.

According to angry 'slave ads' released from her outraged enslaver Nathaniel Hunt, he was clearly worried about all the money she was making cooking lunches and ale for the Roanoke Canal workers, where she had made plenty of friends and supporters.

He wrote that he was informed she'd been living near Halifax and spent summers in Rock Landing, where "she cooked for the hands employed on the Canal." He added, "at the above places she has many acquaintances.”

He warned her friends and supporters not to help her.

"I forewarn all owners of boats, captains and owners of vessels from taking on board their vessels or carrying away this woman and her child Eliza.

He also tried to steal her free name, writing, "The proper name of the woman is Piety, but she will no doubt change it."

Young was not the only Freedom Seeker known to have escaped to Rock Landing. At least five 'fugitive slave ads' point to Freedom Seekers who made their way to the canal town of Rock Landing.

Why did Rock Landing become a ghost town?

Today, Rock Landing is just a name on a street sign.

In its heyday, Rock Landing was a major terminus on the Roanoke Canal. According to letters and writings from the era, it was slated to be the next New York City or Philadephia and was wondered metropolitan.

"There were taverns, restaurants, shops, a hotel and homes. A bustling port with workers eating lunch. People from New York speculated on the land. Some of my research shows it may have even had one of the first Oddfellows organizations," he said. "It was a canal boom town."

So why would such a metropolitan town eventually become a ghost town?

"The railroad came through and made the canal obsolete," said Green-Hockaday.

The railroad bypassed Rock Landing all-together, leaving the once-bustling port town out of the path of progress.

Even the famous Roanoke Canal itself has even been mostly flooded beneath the lake – forgotten by time.

However, there's a stretch still of dry land where people can hike or even visit the historic remnants at the Roanoke Canal Museum & Trail.

Along that stretch is a 200-year-old stone aqueduct built using enslaved labor that was also used to help freedom seekers escaping slavery along the canal.

Patsy Young inspires new generation of Black women working in brewing

According to experts at Good Beer Hunting, enslaved men and women played a major role in the history of beer brewing.

"It was enslaved people and other household laborers who were critical to beer production in the earliest years of American history," they wrote.

Young's ale was not only popular enough to earn her livelihood in freedom, but famous enough that her story and beer have continued to capture imaginations nearly 200 years later.

"Some local brewers and historians are working to try and re-create her beer in her name and honor her history and memory," said Green-Hockaday.

Celeste Beatty, owner and creator of Harlem Brewing Company – and Harlem Brew South in Rocky Mount – is the first Black woman in the United States to own a brewery. Beatty, who has made history as a brewer herself, is inspired by Patsy Young's story. So nearly 200 years after Young first brewed her famous ale, Beatty hopes to create a beer inspired by Young's story.

Learn more about Harlem Brewing South in Rocky Mount on their website.

A look at the rich history of Halifax County

Halifax County, N.C. — It was the first railroad hub of the South. It's a place where the first action was taken in 1776 declaring independence from Great Britain. Halifax County holds a place in American history, which includes the lives of freed and enslaved Black people.Three locations within the county are designated sites for the National Park Service's Network to Freedom: the old town of Halifax called Historic Halifax, the Roanoke River and the Roanoke Canal. The three sites were a part of the Underground Railroad Network...

Halifax County, N.C. — It was the first railroad hub of the South. It's a place where the first action was taken in 1776 declaring independence from Great Britain. Halifax County holds a place in American history, which includes the lives of freed and enslaved Black people.

Three locations within the county are designated sites for the National Park Service's Network to Freedom: the old town of Halifax called Historic Halifax, the Roanoke River and the Roanoke Canal. The three sites were a part of the Underground Railroad Network to Freedom.

Through research in 2013, historian Rodney Pierce says he is one who made the connection to identify the Roanoke Canal as part of the journey.

Uncovering Black History

Pierce, from Halifax County, is dedicated to uncovering the untold history in his community. During the bulk of Pierce's research, he was the cultural resource leader at the Roanoke Canal Museum and Trail.

"We knew that the Underground Railroad ran through the Town of Halifax, and we knew that it ran through the Roanoke River," said Pierce. "And so knowing that the batteaux (or boats) were driven by enslaved Black men who sometimes did not have white survivors, I hypothesized - these guys probably used these barrels that we were carrying salt and other goods in to sneak enslaved people to freedom."

Though uncovering history and his research, Pierce says he got the calling to become a teacher in his community.

"I also knew that if I wasn't taught what I learned while I was working here, then they probably weren't being taught that either," said Pierce. "So, they needed to know it."

Pierce says he wants to educate students on the full picture of the town's history so they know the role their ancestors played.

Confederate at Center

Beyond history, Pierce's activism in the community continues present day. Historic Weldon, also in Halifax County, was a bustling center of activity during the Civil War with several Confederate training camps in the area.

One Confederate statue still remains, in what is now a predominately Black neighborhood in Weldon. Pierce and neighbors are working to get the statue relocated to Historic Halifax.

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Angela Person, who is from Halifax County, still has family in the area and says she wants the statue to come down soon.

"Children are out and riding their bikes and trying to enjoy life as young Black children, and then they have this statue standing over them with a gun in his hands. And I would be threatened," said Person. "I would go home and ask questions. 'Why is there a man with gun standing, hovering over me?'"

Weldon's town administrator says he put together a relocation presentation on the statue and presented it to the Weldon Board of Commissioners. In over a year, the commissioners have not taken any action.

A separate stone that sat out front of the county courthouse, which honored a Confederate general, has since been removed.

The Cemetery

Learning the history of Halifax County means looking into one’s own family lineage. Pierce says he has always wanted to learn about his ancestors, but looking into the town's past was more natural for him.

One of his mentors and lifelong friends, Dr. Terence Wyche, is a genealogist who put in the work to find out his own family story. Wyche says for years he would spend time in the family records section of the Halifax County Library, looking for anything he could find on his ancestors, the Hawkins family.

Aside from the library, he would visit a cemetery. It’s where some of his ancestors are buried, and he knows their stories.

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“Reverend Captain Hawkins was not a slave, but his father was a slave. His name was Robert Hawkins, and he is listed in the slave register,” said Wyche. “Next to this is his mother-in-law, Lizzie Diggs Hicks, as well as his wife Sallie Diggs Hawkins."

He says this cemetery is where they believe Sary was buried. According to Wyche’s research, she is the first recorded Black Hawkins to come to Halifax County. Wyche says she was born around 1780 and, based on records he has uncovered, she is the start of 95% of the Black Hawkins family.

She is Wyche’s fifth-great grandmother, and Pierce’s sixth-great grandmother.

Wyche says while tending the cemetery one day, he got the call to look more into the stories of his family.

"I looked back, I head an inaudible voice - just in my mind it said 'tell our story,'” said Wyche. “And I sought to just make them come alive."

Connecting the Dots

Dr. Terence Wyche says many of his weekends in the '90s were dedicated to going to the Halifax County Library. He would go through the Bible records and the family records on file to find any information his could about his ancestors – the Hawkins family.

He says his mom and grandparents are the people who got him interested in his ancestry.

“There was no ancestry.com, so you had to go through the files,” said Wyche. “Open up these old documents and dust and everything just falling, you had no choice but to do it.”

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It’s a time consuming process, but for Wyche it was worth it.

“It was just so rewarding to just be able to just see that these names that you heard so much about, they began to become alive,” said Wyche.

Through his research he has put together two books on his family history. It includes hundreds of family members and copies of slave registries. He has information on how much money an enslaved person in his family was valued for by their slave owners.

His book includes information on the slave owners too – James Maddison Hawkins, and his family.

Reconnecting a Family

Dr. Wyche’s research means being able to connect with family members he never knew he before. He says at the first family reunion in 1995 close to 1,200 of Sary’s descendants were there. Sary is the first recorded Black Hawkins that Wyche has been able to find, born around 1780.

“We thought that was remarkable,” said Wyche.

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He says no matter if they were first cousins on 20th cousins, the family embraced each other.

Plenty of the family had not met each other before, or if they had met they didn’t know they were related. What they did share was similar stories.

“We couldn’t date, we couldn’t go traveling. We couldn’t go to a ball game with people,” said a cousin remembering how it was growing up in Halifax County. “Until my mom and dad approved of it. I thought they were just being over protective, but come to find out they were just looking out to make sure we weren’t dating our cousin.”

It’s stories they laugh about now, knowing their family connections.

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