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Frame The Importance of

Commercial Truck Insurance in Morehead City, NC

  • Let's face it - truckers in America have always been the backbone of our great country. They still are in modern times. On any given day, thousands of trucks traverse our highways and local roads, delivering goods and products on time so that businesses and consumers have what they need to live life. And while commercial trucking can be an incredibly lucrative way to make a living and put food on the table, it can also be risky and expensive.
  • Whether you're the owner of a fleet, an independent trucker, or have a business that uses big rigs to transport goods, you need commercial trucking insurance to protect you and your client's investments, shield you from liability, and more.
  • That's where working with a reliable truck insurance agency comes into play. Unfortunately, for many commercial truck insurance providers, serving the needs of truckers is low on the proverbial totem pole. At Independence Insurance Agency, nothing could be further from the truth.

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percent The Commercial Truck

Insurance Agency in Morehead City, NC You Can Trust

Much like you pride yourself on running a successful trucking business, Independence Insurance Agency prides itself on its years of experience providing truck insurance for hardworking men and women across the country. And in our experience, insurance rates for truckers are just too high - so high, in fact, that they eat away at their bottom line, making it more difficult to run a business and make a profit. Fortunately, at Independence Insurance Agency, we provide truckers the freedom they need from astronomically high insurance rates so they can stay on the road and keep driving America forward.

As one of the most trusted commercial trucking insurance agencies in the U.S., we understand the challenges that you face daily as a trucker. We also know how important it is to protect your business. That's why we go above and beyond to find you the best-priced coverage available, whether you're an operator, own a small fleet, a large fleet, or something in between.

Commercial Truck Insurance Morehead City, NC

We Put Truckers First Because Others Don't

 Truck Insurance Morehead City, NC

Truckers across the country choose to work with Independence Insurance Agency because we put their needs first before anything else. As experts in transportation insurance, we proudly offer a range of quality insurance products that are both practical and affordable for them. Our industry-leading carriers provide coverage that caters to the unique challenges faced by the trucking industry, ensuring that your business is protected at all times.

At our core, we are committed to finding the best possible price for your coverage without compromising the quality of service you deserve. The truth is, we understand how essential truckers are to the United States and take pride in making their insurance experience more streamlined and affordable.

One way we do so is by simplifying the insurance process. Our transportation specialists take the time to understand your specific needs and budget to tailor a comprehensive plan that works for you. You won't ever have to worry about cookie-cutter plans or uninterested agents when you work with our commercial trucking insurance agency. We take an educational approach to ensure that the entire big rig insurance process is quick, painless, and easy to understand. If there's something you don't understand, we're happy to take the time to explain. After all, the success and safety of your business are on the line.

Looking to the future, we are committed to providing innovative new products that cater to the ever-changing needs of truck drivers. As your one-stop shop for commercial trucking insurance, we are dedicated to your success, one policy at a time.

If you're a commercial trucker looking to ensure your rig, you can rest easy knowing that Independence Insurance Agency provides:

  • Affordable Trucking Insurance Plans for Any Budget
  • Exemplary Customer Service
  • Seasoned Transportation Specialists Who Customize Plans to Your Needs
  • A+ Carriers Across the Country
  • Simple, Easy Quote and Bind Process
  • Multiple Insurance Carriers Quoted to Find You the Best Rates
  • Truck Insurance for New Ventures

Call us or send us a message today to learn more about the best 18-wheeler insurance options for your trucking business.

chart The Commercial Truck

Common Types of Big Rig Truck Insurance in Morehead City, NC

At Independence Insurance Agency, we offer several types of insurance coverage for local, intermediate, and long-haul trucking needs. Here are just a few categories of trucking insurance coverage that our agency offers.

As the foundation of your insurance policy, liability coverage is required by law in most states in the U.S. It provides coverage for damage or injuries caused to properties or other people if your 18-wheeler is responsible for the crash. Without liability coverage, it's almost impossible to drive a truck or run a trucking business without major legal consequences.

Having physical damage coverage is an essential component that shouldn't be overlooked. This insurance is responsible for covering the expenses related to repairing or replacing your truck in situations such as accidents, theft, vandalism, and other damaging events. By having this coverage, you can rest assured that your business won't be affected significantly by unexpected incidents, and you can continue running your operations smoothly even in challenging times.

For trucking companies, the goods they transport are crucial to their operations. To protect these goods from damage, loss, or theft while in transit, cargo insurance is essential. This coverage provides much-needed peace of mind for both you and your clients, allowing you to reimburse clients for any losses sustained while protecting your reputation and brand identity.

Non-Trucking Liability Insurance is designed to cover property damage or bodily injury that may occur during personal time when the driver/truck is not under dispatch. This coverage can be applied with or without a trailer and is added to a commercial policy as an endorsement.

While Independence Insurance Agency has built a reputation of excellence in serving the needs of truckers, we also offer general liability. Also known as Truckers General Liability, this coverage insures for bodily injuries or property damage that happen due to business activities that are NOT the cause of operating a truck. It covers accidents that occur in parking lots, rest stops, also while loading or unloading. General liability can also cover losses related to theft and vandalism. Most brokers and shippers will require this coverage to work with you.

Bobtail insurance is a type of coverage that is comparable to non-trucking liability, which is designed to offer protection when driving a truck without a trailer attached. This is commonly referred to as "bobtailing." With bobtail insurance, the tractor is covered at all times, even when it is not attached to a trailer, regardless of whether or not the truck is under dispatch.

Trailer interchange insurance is a must-have if you're involved in a trailer interchange agreement. This essential coverage offers protection for trailers owned by other parties that you're using under a contractual agreement. It covers damages caused by collisions, fire, theft, and vandalism, providing assurance to all parties involved.

Curious whether our commercial truck insurance agency in cityname, state offers additional coverage? The following options can be bound in your insurance policy:

  • Business Interruption Insurance
  • Reefer Breakdown Insurance
  • Occupational Accident with Contract Liability Insurance
  • Rental Reimbursement Insurance
  • Underinsured or Uninsured Motorist Insurance
  • Towing Insurance
  • Electronics Insurance
  • Much More

Three plus 3 Safe Driving Tips to

Lower the Cost of Truck Insurance in Morehead City, NC

Keeping your drivers safe on the road is crucial not only for their own well-being but also for the safety of other motorists and the financial stability of your business. The Department of Labor has identified the trucking industry as one of the most hazardous sectors in the U.S. In fact, trucking and logistics fleets are known for their high injury and fatality rates. By improving how safely your truckers drive, you can help reduce expenses related to claim payouts, accidents, and insurance premium hikes.

Whether you own a large fleet or you're the owner and operator of a single rig, keep these safe driving tips in mind to help lower your insurance costs.

Implement Preventative Maintenance Plans

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

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 Trucking Insurance Morehead City, NC

Practice Defensive Driving

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
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 Commercial Liability Insurance For Truckers Morehead City, NC

Find Ways to Prevent Distracted Driving

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

phone Call Now
 Commercial Truck Insurance Quote Morehead City, NC

Ensuring the safety of your drivers begins with the safety of their vehicles. Trucks and tractor-trailers that do not receive regular maintenance, such as oil and brake pad changes, are more likely to experience breakdowns while on the road. Telematics devices provide real-time insight into engine and odometer data, including fault codes.

This information enables your mechanics to create comprehensive preventative maintenance schedules based on mileage, history of previous breakdowns, days, and more. Additionally, they can receive immediate notifications for critical fault codes. By implementing routine maintenance and proactive repair schedules, you can ensure that your vehicles are in top condition, minimizing the likelihood of breakdowns, which can help reduce the cost of trucker insurance.

 Low Priced Commercial Truck Insurance Morehead City, NC phone Call Now

This approach aims to mitigate the risk of fatal crashes and injuries by proactively identifying and responding to potentially dangerous situations and making informed decisions while driving. By adopting defensive driving techniques, drivers can reduce their likelihood of accidents, thereby minimizing the need for expensive repairs, claim payouts, and increased insurance premiums.

Some of the easiest ways for you or your drivers to practice safe driving include:

  • Be Wary of Blind Spots: Operating a reefer or tractor-trailer means driving high off of the ground, which can make visibility limited, especially in blind spots. To check your blind spot, look over your shoulder and out of your windows while changing lanes.
  • Be Ready for Emergencies on the Road: It's important for drivers to be ready for unexpected situations when driving, especially during long trips. They should be equipped to handle emergencies such as poor driving conditions or big rig breakdowns.
  • Use the Three-Second Rule: Truck drivers should try to maintain a three-second gap between their vehicle and the car in front of them. This means that the truck driver should reach a certain point on the road three seconds after the car in front of them has passed that same point.
  • Always Use Right and Left Turn Indicators: It's important for drivers to always use their turn signals when changing lanes or exiting highways, even if they don't see any other cars around. This is not only required by law, but it also reduces the chances of accidents occurring on the road.
Commercial Truck Insurance Morehead City, NC phone Call Now

According to the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), distracted driving is the primary reason behind truck driver accidents. Any activity that takes a driver's attention away from the road or the steering wheel is considered distracted driving. Distractions can come in various forms, such as eating while driving or gazing at a billboard outside the window. However, the most frequent form of distracted driving is the use of cellphones, specifically texting while driving.

Assuming you or your driver's rigs are equipped with dual-facing cameras, try reviewing footage of an unsafe driving incident. Coach your drivers on ways to correct their unsafe behaviors or look up ways to do so yourself if you're the one operating the big rig. The bottom line is that when your drivers aren't distracted, they drive safer. And when they drive safer, the cost of 18-wheeler insurance in cityname, state can be reduced.

 Truck Insurance Morehead City, NC phone Call Now

check light FAQs About

Independence Insurance Agency

If you're looking for a commercial trucking insurance agency for your business, chances are you have some questions - and we've got answers. Keep reading to learn more about some of the most commonly asked questions we hear from truckers like you.

Why go with a "jack of all trades" when you can work with specialists who focus exclusively on transportation insurance? We have excellent relationships with major trucking insurance carriers and, as such, can provide the best assistance and reasonable rates.

Typically, companies will look at claims that date back three years or less.

We proudly work with more than 20 carriers to provide our clients with the most advantageous options at competitive prices, catering to the needs of owner-operators and big fleets alike.

Permit filings are typically done by insurance companies on the next business day. Federal (FMCSA) filings are completed online and updated immediately, while some states may take up to three weeks to process.

Independence Insurance Agency: Committed to the Trucking Industry

There's no question about it - you've got to protect your staff, your rig, and your trucking business with insurance. But choosing the right insurance partner isn't always easy. Thankfully, with Independence Insurance Agency by your side, you can rest easy knowing you're covered no matter where the road takes you. If you're in need of a commercial truck insurance agency in Morehead City, NC that caters to truckers like you, pick up the phone and contact one of our transportation specialists today. That way, you can get back on the road with confidence tomorrow.

 Trucking Insurance Morehead City, NC

Latest News in Morehead City, NC

Morehead City adopts CAMA land use plan

MOREHEAD CITY - The Comprehensive CAMA (Coastal Area Management Act) Land Use Plan, which has been under review and revision for over a year, was unanimously adopted Aug. 8 at the Morehead City regular council meeting.During this time, several changes were made based on initial council review, including clarifying the town's boundaries, qualifying skewed data due to the time of the 2020 census, removing confusing maps, adding information about transportation project implementation and discussing alternative street des...

MOREHEAD CITY - The Comprehensive CAMA (Coastal Area Management Act) Land Use Plan, which has been under review and revision for over a year, was unanimously adopted Aug. 8 at the Morehead City regular council meeting.

During this time, several changes were made based on initial council review, including clarifying the town's boundaries, qualifying skewed data due to the time of the 2020 census, removing confusing maps, adding information about transportation project implementation and discussing alternative street design for stormwater management.

The plan received preliminary approval from city council in February and soon after passed a completeness review by the N.C. Division of Coastal Management.

In July, the plan was reviewed and unanimously recommended by the town's planning board and committee.

Now that it has the final approval from city council, the plan will be submitted to the Coastal Resources Commission for official certification.

Jonathan Whitehurst of Kimley-Horn, the consulting firm leading the project, provided a status update and discussed the adoption process during the meeting.

Whitehurst expressed appreciation for the community's engagement throughout the planning process, highlighting the input received from local officials and residents.

"We had these pulses of activity throughout the planning process that generated quite a bit of input," Whitehurst said. "There was a lot of participation, a lot of hours invested in the process, and from the consultant point of view, quite a bit of data points in comments to go through that really gave shape to the plan."

The plan's structure has remained largely unchanged since its initial presentation, Whitehurst explained, and is organized around key sections of a future land use map, policy framework and implementation plan.

Whitehurst also noted that while the study area encompassed both the city limits and the ETJ (Extra-Territorial Jurisdiction), the plan does not obligate the city to invest in the ETJ.

Throughout the planning process, certain topics emerged as needing additional attention, such as housing and economic development. To address these areas, the plan incorporated more focused discussions and provisions.

The plan's implementation section comprises three key components: transportation recommendations, parks and recreation recommendations and a detailed action plan for the next decade and beyond.

Following the public hearing, the council voted unanimously to adopt the Comprehensive CAMA Land Use Plan, marking a milestone in the city's development and growth strategy.

The plan's implementation is expected to shape the city's trajectory over the next several years, with provisions for regular updates every five years or so to ensure continued effectiveness.

The entire 165-page document is available for view online at https://moreheadcitync.org.

Water quality swimming alerts issued in Carteret County

MOREHEAD CITY – The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) issued a no-swimming advisory on the sound-side site in Carteret County.According to DENR officials, the water near the public access to Bogue Sound at 16th Street in Morehead City was found to have bacteria levels in the water that exceed the state’s and Environmental Protection Agency’s recreational water quality standards.Officials say test results of water samples showed a running monthly bacteria ave...

MOREHEAD CITY – The North Carolina Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) issued a no-swimming advisory on the sound-side site in Carteret County.

According to DENR officials, the water near the public access to Bogue Sound at 16th Street in Morehead City was found to have bacteria levels in the water that exceed the state’s and Environmental Protection Agency’s recreational water quality standards.

Officials say test results of water samples showed a running monthly bacteria average that was more than what is acceptable. These tests are based on five samples taken within 30 days.

Officials say that Enterococci, which is the bacteria group used for testing, is found in the intestines of warm-blooded animals. While it is not known to cause illness, scientific studies show that Enterococci may indicate the presence of other disease-causing organisms.

According to officials, people swimming or playing in waters with bacteria levels higher than the standards have an increased risk of developing gastrointestinal illness or skin infections.

This advisory is not a beach closing, and officials said that the advisory does not affect the entire Morehead City area. Swimming advisories are for waters within 200 feet of the advisory sign.

State officials will continue testing the site, and they will remove the sign and notify the public again when the bacteria levels decrease to levels below the standards.

CEDAR POINT — Cedar Point commissioners voted Tuesday night to authorize Town Manager David Rief to send out requests for proposals for the town’s annual street improvement program.

The board met in the town hall off Sherwood Avenue.

The streets involved are Bluff Road, Dora Court and Emma Court.

The proposals for all three streets are for resurfacing, repairing depressions and repairing worn out and damaged edges.

The town each year surveys its streets and prioritizes which ones need improvement the most.

Cedar Point intends to negotiate a contract with the contractor offering the best proposal.

According to Rief, the goal is to reach agreement on a proposal based on the cost, time for completion, and the quality of previous, similar work completed.

Proposals must be submitted to the town no later than 5 p.m., Tuesday, Feb. 20 in order to receive consideration.

If a contract is not concluded within a 30-day period after receipt of proposals, the town reserves the right to terminate all negotiations and select another contractor’s proposal or issue a new request for proposals.

Rief said any selected contractor must be able to complete the job no later than June 30.

Cape Carteret commissioners intend to review all bids and arrive at a final approval for a contract award at their Tuesday, Feb. 27 meeting.

The town has set specific standards to which the selected contractor must adhere and reserves the right to reject any and all bids and to waive any informality or technicality of a proposal.

PINE KNOLL SHORES — The N.C. Aquariums regularly care for sick or injured sea turtles throughout the year, but winter weather brings an influx of turtles due to cold-stunning events. So far this season, the aquariums have cared for over 200 turtles caught in frigid water temperatures, unable to swim due to a hypothermia-like response.

Sea turtles are cold-blooded, which means their surroundings determine their body temperature. Juvenile green, loggerhead, and Kemp’s ridley sea turtles use the area’s shallow sounds as rich feeding grounds in the summer and fall. When a turtle senses the cooling fall temperature, it usually heads for warmer waters. When temperatures drop too quickly, they miss their chance to leave and become cold-stunned.

“Their heart rate and other functions slow, leaving them lethargic and unable to swim,” said Michele Lamping, aquarist and sea turtle specialist for the N.C. Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores (NCAPKS). “Prolonged exposure can result in paralysis, and the turtles float on the surface or wash up on beaches.”

Drastic changes in the weather along the coast in the last few weeks have led to many cold-stunned sea turtles needing rescue and rehabilitation. As of Jan. 23, the N.C. Aquarium at Pine Knoll Shores is caring for 42 cold-stunned sea turtles. The aquarium at Roanoke Island (NCARI) is caring for 111 turtles, with more to arrive.

This year, the aquariums have already rehabilitated and released 63 cold-stunned sea turtles, including ones received from New England. These numbers fluctuate regularly as cold-stunned sea turtles continue to be found, rehabilitated and released.

The aquariums receive turtles from several coastal locations. Turtles taken to NCAPKS were recovered from Cape Lookout National Seashore, Core Sound and ocean-side areas. Turtles found on the northern Outer Banks from Ocracoke to the Virginia state line are taken to the Sea Turtle Assistance and Rehabilitation (STAR) Center at NCARI.

The fieldwork to locate and transport the cold-stunned turtles to care facilities can be grueling work in frigid temperatures. Biologists from Cape Lookout National Seashore and Cape Hatteras National Seashore, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) and volunteers from sea turtle conservation groups like the Network for Endangered Sea Turtles (N.E.S.T.) locate, record and transport patients to regional facilities.

In the southern part of the state, the stranded turtles are taken to the Center for Marine Sciences and Technology (CMAST) in Morehead City for assessment and initial treatment. Once the turtles are triaged, the N.C. Aquarium veterinary team and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission (NCWRC) work to divide the patients among rehabilitation centers along the coast, including the Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center in Surf City and the N.C. Aquariums at Pine Knoll Shores and Fort Fisher.

From Ocracoke north, stranded turtles move through a staging site on Hatteras Island for documentation and then are transported directly to the STAR Center at the N.C. Aquarium on Roanoke Island. Initial assessment and treatments are completed there under the supervision of the veterinary team.

“Cold-stun rehabilitation can take anywhere from two weeks to multiple months, depending on the health status of the turtle when they arrive. We work closely with our veterinary team administer individual care to be sure that they are ready for release,” said Amber Hitt, STAR Center coordinator at NCARI.

During rehabilitation, the care team slowly warms up the turtles and ensures they can swim and lift their heads comfortably out of the water to breathe. A variety of foods are offered to tempt patients to eat. Along with nutritional care, technicians administer treatments prescribed by the vet team, including fluids, antibiotics, eye drops and wound care.

Once the turtles are healthy and have a final veterinary check, they are eligible for release. The last step is placing a small microchip in the front flipper of each turtle. If these turtles strand again, rehabbers and researchers can learn where they were seen last and how much they’ve grown.

It’s a group effort to care for and release the sea turtles. Winter releases require partnerships with boats that can release the turtles offshore. Typically, they are released in warm water near the Gulf Stream, 70 degrees Fahrenheit or above. Crews from Duke Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, the U.S. Coast Guard Stations at Cape Hatteras and Fort Macon, and private fishing vessels have helped release rehabilitated turtles.

The effort to rescue and rehabilitate sea turtles is led by the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission, which collaborates with several federal, state and private organizations, including N.C. Aquariums on Roanoke Island, at Pine Knoll Shores and at Fort Fisher, as well as the Center for Marine Sciences and Technology, N.C. State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Cape Lookout National Seashore, Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center, Network for Endangered Sea Turtles (NEST), Cape Hatteras National Seashore, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Marine Fisheries Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

If anyone sees a turtle in the water or on the beach this time of year that is not moving or is sluggish, do not push the animal back into the water or attempt to transport it but call the Sea Turtle Stranding Hotline to report the turtle, and they will give instructions and send someone to retrieve and document the turtle.

For those who find a stranded turtle, use one of the following phone numbers based on location:

HARKERS ISLAND — Cape Lookout National Seashore, the N.C. Coastal Reserve and National Estuarine Research Reserve and the Foundation for Shackleford Horses, Inc., are partnering to create a volunteer opportunity, known as the Pony Patrol.

These volunteers will help to raise community awareness, protect wild horses and increase visitor compliance with regards to wild horse rules and guidelines at Shackleford Banks and Rachel Carson Reserve. In 2023, a pilot version of this program was successfully run on Shackleford Banks, with volunteers conducting 48 patrols and contacting over 2,000 visitors.

Prospective Pony Patrol volunteers will work three- to four-hour shifts, walking Rachel Carson Reserve and/or Shackleford Banks and talking with visitors about how to best experience the beauty and natural behavior of the horses. Pony Patrol volunteers will receive training in effectively communicating with visitors; in understanding the importance of giving wild horses space to be wild; and in the knowledge and skills to protect both the visitors’ safety and the wild horses’ welfare, so that ultimately, they can answer basic questions about the horses and their natural-barrier island homes.

Candidates must be at least 18 years old and a U.S. citizen/permanent resident and be physically able to walk the beach in a dynamic setting, consisting of sandy terrain, extreme sun, heat, humidity, wind and buggy environments. Pony Patrol volunteers will be expected to work three- to four-hour shifts at least three times per month.

Interested candidates should apply online at: https://tinyurl.com/PonyPatrol2024.

The application period is open and will close on Feb. 23. Applicants must apply to both locations if they want to volunteer for Rachel Carson Reserve and Shackleford Banks. Selected candidates will be contacted for an interview in early March.

For more information on Cape Lookout National Seashore, go to: nps.gov/calo, For more information on Rachel Carson Reserve, go to: deq.nc.gov/coastalreserve. For more information on the Foundation for Shackleford Horses, go to: shackleford-horses.org.

Veterans Day Parade in Morehead City expected to be huge

MOREHEAD CITY — The Carteret County Veterans Day Parade is coming back in a big way on Nov. 4, so much so that organizers had to extend the registration deadline until Oct. 27 to accommodate last-minute entries.“This is going to be the biggest one in 20 years,” parade organizer John Sortikys said on Oct 25.The 2023 Carteret County Veterans Day Parade will start at 11 a.m. Nov. 4. The parade will start at 18th Street and proceed down Arendell Street in the east-bound lane to 5th Street. The vie...

MOREHEAD CITY — The Carteret County Veterans Day Parade is coming back in a big way on Nov. 4, so much so that organizers had to extend the registration deadline until Oct. 27 to accommodate last-minute entries.

“This is going to be the biggest one in 20 years,” parade organizer John Sortikys said on Oct 25.

The 2023 Carteret County Veterans Day Parade will start at 11 a.m. Nov. 4. The parade will start at 18th Street and proceed down Arendell Street in the east-bound lane to 5th Street. The viewing stand will be between 10th and 11th streets at the Train Depot, but “everyone can pull up a seat by bringing their own lawn chairs,” Sortikys said.

As of Oct. 25, there were 108 entries, with one of the main attractions being the U.S. Air Force Presidential Honor Guard Drill Team and Ceremonial Marching Unit from Washington, D.C.

The drill team and unit will also visit eastern North Carolina schools next week, including appearances at Broad Creek Middle School and West Carteret High School on Tuesday.

In addition, the teams will appear at The Wall That Heals, which will be visiting Walter B. Jones Park in Havelock Nov. 2-5. The Wall That Heals exhibit includes a three-quarter scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, along with a mobile Education Center. For times regarding The Wall That Heals, visit https://www.thewallthathealshavelock.org/.

As for the parade, this year’s grand marshal is U.S. Marine Corps combat veteran Capt. Daniel McMahon of Morehead City. An additional parade marshal will be Col. Brendan C. Burks, commanding officer at Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point.

There is also a scheduled visit by the state’s oldest living U.S. Coast Guard veteran, Houston Salter. Plus, the parade will include veterans from wars and military conflicts beginning with World War II. There are an estimated 8,000 veterans living in Carteret County, according to Sortikys.

Veterans wishing to be part of this event and wanting to join with veterans of a particular era need not complete an entry form. They only have to show up by 10 a.m. on the day of the parade at one of the following locations:

• World War II and Korean veterans will assemble at Shelby’s at the corner of Arendell and 14th Street.

• Vietnam to current Global War on Terror veterans will assemble in the parking lot at the corner of Arendell and 17th Street.

Golf carts and other vehicles will be available for those who wish to ride.

The parade is being sponsored by the Veterans Coalition of the Crystal Coast, the town of Morehead City and other sponsors.

Sortikys said he was excited to see the enthusiasm for the parade, which had been canceled or held virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic. Since that time, organizers had struggled to get the in-person parade back in place. Plus, there was a lack of volunteers to help plan the event.

Sortikys said that has changed this year, with 42 parade committee members.

“I am so grateful for the members of the committee,” he said. “They have all been doing so much. And when this one is over, we’ll be back in January to start working on next year’s parade.”

He also thanked the town of Morehead City, which he said got behind the effort to bring the in-person parade back.

According to the website, the parade was established to allow veterans, veterans service organizations, individuals and other groups and organizations to have the opportunity to remember and honor the nation’s veterans who have proudly served the country. Over the years, the parade has grown from only a handful of participants to more than 2,000.

Visit carteretcountyveteransdayparade.com/registration-1 to complete the entry form online by 5 p.m. Oct. 27. For more information, call 252-499-0146.

Sugarloaf Island protection effort underway in Bogue Sound off Morehead City

MOREHEAD CITY — The vital restoration of Sugarloaf Island, Morehead City's protective barrier island in Bogue Sound, has officially commenced, supported by $6.6 million in N.C. state legislative funding.The town heralded the beginning of the project Wednesday in a press conference at Big Rock Landing on the waterfront.“This significant financial injection is set to play a crucial role in addressing the alarming erosion of the island, which has been under threat with each passing sto...

MOREHEAD CITY — The vital restoration of Sugarloaf Island, Morehead City's protective barrier island in Bogue Sound, has officially commenced, supported by $6.6 million in N.C. state legislative funding.

The town heralded the beginning of the project Wednesday in a press conference at Big Rock Landing on the waterfront.

“This significant financial injection is set to play a crucial role in addressing the alarming erosion of the island, which has been under threat with each passing storm, jeopardizing its protective capabilities for Morehead City during storms and high tides,” the town said in a news release. “The unwavering support of N.C. Sen. Norman Sanderson state Rep. Celeste Cairns and former state Rep. Pat McElraft has been instrumental in securing this funding.

“Their commitment ensures that expert teams will now focus on advanced shoreline stabilization techniques, blending shoreline enhancement with public utility and natural habitat restoration,” Morehead City officials said in a news release Wednesday. “Aquatic restoration experts Sea & Shoreline (of Florida), the N.C. Coastal Federation, the Town of Morehead City, Quible & Associates, Sandbar Oyster Company and East Carolina University have spent the last two years studying, designing, planning, and permitting this project to restore and protect the island.”

The release states,” A notable component of this plan and project is wave attenuation devices (WAD®s). With over 300 of the proposed 1,200 devices already constructed, these offshore breakwater devices are designed to counter erosion by diffusing wave energy, assisting in the reformation of the shoreline through sand accretion, supporting seagrass growth to enhance water quality, and creating essential fish habitat. This living shoreline project will also include installation of seagrass planting units, saltmarsh plants, and oyster reefs, and is expected to be complete by mid-2024.”

The widespread advantages of this initiative encompass:

● Countering erosion, rebuilding the shoreline.

● Amplifying the coastal resilience of Morehead City.

● Expanding fish habitats, leading to enhanced fishing opportunities.

● Boosting ecotourism.

● Improving seagrass presence and overall water quality.

● Preventing the loss of trees and shorebird habitat.

● Augmenting carbon sequestration.

In the release, Morehead City Mayor Jerry Jones said, “The rejuvenation and resiliency of our island have been long-standing objectives for our town. With the recent financial backing from the N.C. State Legislature, our aspirations are now within reach. We’re excited that this project is now coming to life.”

Back in 2022, the mayor put it this way in an event reported in the News-Times.

"Sugarloaf Island gave Morehead City the economic opportunity of growth on the waterfront," said Jones. "It is the Outer Banks of Morehead City. Over the years in my lifetime, I've seen at least 1,000 feet of Sugarloaf erode away. It used to extend as far west as 12th Street, and now it's at about 9th Street. So, we've lost about three blocks, and that erosion is accelerating."

At the same event in 2022, McElraft said, "We've known the importance of this project has been here for years, and we are so blessed in Carteret County to have our marine scientists, who have all banded together with the coastal federation, to find the best environmentally friendly solution for the buffer or speed bump protecting this beautiful city of Morehead City. We have been so blessed in the legislature to have saved so much rainy-day money that we were able to do some storm mitigation and resilience."

Sanderson said at the time, "I don't want 50 years from now somebody standing on this dock saying, 'Didn't there used to be an island out there?' Morehead City, like a lot of places in North Carolina, has a big dependence on those who come to visit, so we have to preserve Sugarloaf Island. We have to keep it in good order. If we preserve it, generation after generation will continue to come to this area in eastern North Carolina."

Sea & Shoreline is a Florida-based aquatic restoration firm that specializes in improving water quality and making communities more resilient to the effects of climate change. Services include environmental dredging, seagrass/submerged aquatic vegetation restoration, natural stormwater filtration, oyster reefs, artificial reefs, living shorelines, wave attenuation devices, rip-rap, vegetated retaining walls, wetland plantings, invasives control, project design, surveying, permitting, and funding.

For more information, visit seaandshoreline.com.

The N.C. Coastal Federation, based in Ocean off Highway 24 between Newport and Cape Carteret, is a member-supported 501(c)3 that focuses on protecting and restoring the North Carolina coast. Since 1982, the federation has been in the field restoring miles of coastline; training and educating students, adults, and communities to take actions that result in cleaner coastal waters and advocating for an accessible, healthy, productive coast.

Created to give a united voice to the need for long-term coastal management, the federation remains a collaborative, grassroots organization at its heart and brings together traditional and nontraditional organizations, government agencies and businesses in order to achieve what is best for the North Carolina coast and to leave a legacy of clean water for future generations.

The federation has 16,000 supporters and reaches almost 300,000 people directly each year. For more information, visit nccoast.org, or follow on social media LinkedIn, Facebook, and Instagram.

MOREHEAD CITY — The sounds of melodious notes from violins and cellos filled the air of the West Carteret High School auditorium Wednesday as the NC Symphony performed for county fourth-grade students.

The Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament Foundation sponsors the symphony’s educational concert for county fourth-graders each year. More than 600 students were bussed to the high school for the performance.

Committed to engaging students of all ages across North Carolina, the NC Symphony leads one of the most extensive education programs of any symphony orchestras in the country, serving more than 100,000 students each year.

In alignment with the curriculum standards set by the NC Department of Public Instruction, the symphony provides training and lesson planning resources to all music teachers in the state. The conductor for the Carteret County concert was Michelle DiRusso, associate conductor for the NC Symphony.

Craig Everett, the arts education director for the Carteret County public school system, said, “One of the goals of Carteret County Public Schools is to provide memorable and meaningful learning opportunities for our students. The first time I saw a professional symphony orchestra was truly a life-changing experience for me. We hope it will be the same for some of our students attending this concert.”

The theme of the concert series is “What Makes Music, Music?” The symphony performed many classical pieces from great composers like Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and Scott Joplin. During the performance, like a skilled weaver, the conductor wove in lessons on the elements of music, which included structure, dynamics, rhythm and melody.

DiRusso also introduced students to the various sections of the orchestra, which were strings, woodwinds, brass and percussion.

Crystal Hesmer, director of the Big Rock Foundation, said the organization is committed to bringing the symphony each year for students to enjoy.

“I think some of us (members of the foundation) have had experiences of seeing the symphony. It is a fantastic experience and I would not want one of our students to miss this opportunity,” she said.

Prior to the concert, bass player Bruce Ridge spent a few minutes introducing Newport Elementary School fourth-grade student Jack Wright to the bass.

Judging by the reaction of the youngster, he enjoyed his first lesson.

“I used to play guitar,” he said. “This makes me super happy.”

His teacher, Ashley Lawrence, said bringing her students to experience a symphony performance made her happy, too.

“It’s something that many of them have not been exposed to,” she said. “It’s a new experience and an experience that will remain with them the rest of their lives.”

Contact Cheryl Burke at 252-726-7081, ext. 255; email Cheryl@thenewstimes.com; or follow on Twitter @cherylccnt.

Morehead City Port helps deliver record-breaking revenue in FY23

MOREHEAD CITY - The Morehead City Port is reporting record revenue in fiscal year (FY) 2023 as the business continues to expand and push its capabilities.The N.C. State Ports Authority recorded $79.3 million in revenue this fiscal year, marking a 16.7% increase from the previous year's record of $68 million.The performance was driven by a strong annual intermodal growth and year-over-year growth in throughput volume, according to a press release from Port Communications Manager Elly Cosgrove. Intermodal is defi...

MOREHEAD CITY - The Morehead City Port is reporting record revenue in fiscal year (FY) 2023 as the business continues to expand and push its capabilities.

The N.C. State Ports Authority recorded $79.3 million in revenue this fiscal year, marking a 16.7% increase from the previous year's record of $68 million.

The performance was driven by a strong annual intermodal growth and year-over-year growth in throughput volume, according to a press release from Port Communications Manager Elly Cosgrove. Intermodal is defined as moving freight by two or more modes of transportation.

Additionally, the Port of Morehead City and the Port of Wilmington moved almost 4.6 million short tons of bulk and breakbulk cargo in the fiscal year, representing a record-breaking 12% year-over-year growth for general cargo volume.

"The entire N.C. Ports team continues to focus on supporting our customers and delivering on our mission and did a tremendous job identifying solutions to safely grow our volumes during the year," Brian Clark, executive director of the North Carolina State Ports Authority, said.

The port played a pivotal role in handling diverse commodities, including products such as lumber, cement, steel, rubber, paper pulp, fiber pipe, fuselage and locomotives.

The port's performance in bulk cargo saw a considerable boost, mostly driven by agriculture and forest-related exports such as fertilizer, grain, feed, wood chips and wood pellets.

"The general cargo teams in both Wilmington and Morehead City, supported by our business development team, did amazing things this year," Clark said. "They identified unique solutions for our customers, took advantage of ad hoc vessel calls and secured new regular services. Our strategic decision to remain diversified between containers and general cargo continues to serve us well and will remain a focus going forward."

The success of Morehead City and Wilmington ports' intermodal rail services was yet another standout achievement in FY23.

The ports experienced a 74.2% year-over-year increase in intermodal volume, showing strong connections to inland markets.

The Midwest Express rail service and Queen City Express rail service to Charlotte played a significant role in allowing reliable access to key markets, with an average of more than 550 20-foot equivalent units (TEUs) per week, according to the press release information provided by the port communications department.

Investments in cold chain infrastructure have also positioned the Wilmington Port as a gateway for the movement of refrigerated cargoes, officials said.

With the nearing completion of Phase 2 of the refrigerated container yard expansion project, the Wilmington Port is anticipated to nearly double its plug capacity to almost 1,600.

Looking ahead in Morehead City, officials say the port remains committed to expanding its facilities and services with multiple on-port projects.

Projects in Morehead City include berth improvements, crane rail extension and the construction of new warehouse space.

"Our dedicated, customized approach allows the N.C. Ports team to deliver best-in-class service to our customers," Chief Commercial Officer Hans Bean said. "We continue to identify solutions for our port users and tailor our growth to meet customer needs and long-term plans."

Appropriations funding from the General Assembly will support expansion projects, while revenue from moving cargo and grants will support core investments.

"North Carolina Ports' strong Fiscal Year 2023 performance, along with financial support from annual state appropriations, allows our team to continue to execute an aggressive expansion plan that will enable us to capture new business, ultimately enhancing the economy of North Carolina," Clark said. "We are extremely grateful for our partners at the local, state and federal levels."

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